UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

SCHEDULE 14A

(Rule 14a-101)

INFORMATION REQUIRED IN PROXY STATEMENT

SCHEDULE 14A INFORMATION

Proxy Statement Pursuant to Section 14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

Filed by the Registrant

Filed by a Party other than the Registrant

Check the appropriate box:

Preliminary Proxy Statement

Confidential, for Use of the Commission Only (as permitted by Rule 14a-6(e)(2))

Definitive Proxy Statement

Definitive Additional Materials

Soliciting Material Pursuant to §240.14a-12

OLD DOMINION FREIGHT LINE, INC.

_________________________________________________________

(Name of Registrant as Specified In Its Charter)

_________________________________________________________

(Name of Person(s) Filing Proxy Statement, if Other Than the Registrant)

Payment of Filing Fee (Check the appropriate box):

No fee required

Fee paid previously with preliminary materials

Fee computed on table in exhibit required by Item 25(b) per Exchange Act Rules 14a-6(i)(1) and 0-11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

OLD DOMINION FREIGHT LINE, INC.

500 Old Dominion Way
Thomasville, North Carolina 27360

NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS

The Annual Meeting of Shareholders of Old Dominion Freight Line, Inc. will be held Wednesday, May 18, 2022, at 10:00 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time, at our principal executive offices, 500 Old Dominion Way, Thomasville, North Carolina 27360, for the following purposes:

 

1.

To elect eleven directors to our Board of Directors for one-year terms and until their respective successors have been elected and qualified or until their death, resignation, removal or disqualification or until there is a decrease in the number of directors, as set forth in the accompanying proxy statement.

 

2.

To approve, on an advisory basis, the compensation of our named executive officers.

 

3.

To ratify the appointment of Ernst & Young LLP as our independent registered public accounting firm for the year ending December 31, 2022.

 

4.

To transact such other business, if any, as may be properly brought before the meeting or any adjournment thereof.

Shareholders of record at the close of business on March 10, 2022, are entitled to notice of and to vote at the meeting.

By Order of the Board of Directors

Ross H. Parr

Senior Vice President - Legal Affairs,

General Counsel and Secretary

Thomasville, North Carolina

April 18, 2022

If you do not intend to be present at the meeting, we ask that you vote your shares using a toll-free telephone number, the Internet or by signing, dating and returning the accompanying proxy card promptly so that your shares of common stock may be represented and voted at the Annual Meeting. Instructions regarding the different voting options that we provide are contained in the accompanying proxy statement.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS TO THE PROXY STATEMENT

 

2022 Proxy Statement Summary

 

1

General Information

 

7

Security Ownership of Management and Certain Beneficial Owners

 

9

Proposal 1 - Election of Directors

 

11

Executive Officers

 

13

Corporate Governance

 

14

Board Leadership Structure

 

14

Independent Directors

 

15

Attendance and Committees of the Board

 

15

Corporate Governance Guidelines

 

17

Code of Business Conduct

 

17

Shareholder Communications with the Board

 

18

Director Nominations

 

18

Effect of Withheld Votes on an Uncontested Election

 

21

Risk Management

 

22

Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) Matters

 

23

Audit Committee Pre-Approval Policies and Procedures

 

25

Policy for Accounting Complaints

 

25

Policy Against Hedging and Pledging of Company Securities

 

25

Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation

 

25

Report of Audit Committee

 

26

Compensation Discussion and Analysis

 

27

Executive Summary of Compensation Program

 

27

Objectives of Our Executive Compensation Program

 

30

Role of Compensation Committee, Independent Directors and Management

 

31

Role of Compensation Consultant

 

32

Elements of Compensation

 

33

Advisory Vote on Executive Compensation

 

44

Conclusions

 

45

Compensation Committee Report

 

45

Executive Compensation

 

46

Summary Compensation Table

 

46

2021 Grants of Plan-Based Awards

 

48

Outstanding Equity Awards at 2021 Fiscal Year-End

 

49

2021 Stock Vested

 

50

 


 

2021 Nonqualified Deferred Compensation

 

51

Potential Payments Upon Termination or Change of Control

 

52

Life Insurance Policy

 

54

David Congdon Employment Agreement

 

54

Old Dominion Freight Line, Inc. Change of Control Severance Plan for Key Executives

 

56

CEO Pay Ratio Disclosure

 

56

Director Compensation

 

57

2021 Compensation of Directors

 

57

Components of Compensation

 

58

Equity Compensation Plan Information

 

59

Related Person Transactions

 

59

Executive Officer and Director Family Relationships

 

59

Other Family Relationships

 

60

Audit Committee Approval and Related Person Transactions Policy

 

60

Proposal 2 - Approval, on an Advisory Basis, of the Compensation of our Named Executive
Officers

 

61

Proposal 3 – Ratification of the Appointment of our Independent Registered Public Accounting
Firm

 

63

Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm Fees and Services

 

64

Annual Report on Form 10-K

 

64

Important Notice Regarding Delivery of Shareholder Documents

 

64

Deadline for Shareholder Proposals

 

65

 

 

 

 


 

 

OLD DOMINION FREIGHT LINE, INC.

Principal Executive Offices: 500 Old Dominion Way

Thomasville, North Carolina 27360

___________________

PROXY STATEMENT

___________________

Important Notice Regarding the Availability of Proxy Materials

for the Shareholder Meeting to be held on May 18, 2022:

 

The Notice of Annual Meeting of Shareholders, Proxy Statement, Form of Proxy and 2021 Annual Report to Shareholders are available on our corporate website at https://ir.odfl.com/annual-shareholder-meeting-information.

This proxy statement is first being sent to shareholders on or about April 18, 2022, in connection with the solicitation of proxies by and on behalf of the Board of Directors (the “Board”) of Old Dominion Freight Line, Inc. for use at the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held at our principal executive offices, 500 Old Dominion Way, Thomasville, North Carolina 27360 on Wednesday, May 18, 2022, at 10:00 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time, and at any adjournment thereof. If you need directions so you can attend the Annual Meeting and vote in person, please contact our Corporate Secretary at (336) 889-5000.

 

2022 Proxy Statement Summary

This summary highlights information contained elsewhere in this proxy statement. This summary does not contain all of the information that you should consider, and you should read the entire proxy statement carefully before voting.

Annual Meeting of Shareholders

 

•      Time and Date

10:00 a.m., Wednesday, May 18, 2022

 

•      Place

Old Dominion’s principal executive offices

 

500 Old Dominion Way

 

Thomasville, North Carolina 27360

 

•      Record Date

March 10, 2022

 

 

•      Voting

Shareholders as of the record date are entitled to vote. Each share of common stock is entitled to one vote for each director nominee and one vote for each of the proposals to be voted on at the meeting.

 

•      Admission

If you decide to attend the meeting in person, upon your arrival you will need to register with our receptionist in the main lobby of our principal executive offices. See page 7 for further instructions and registration requirements.

 

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Meeting Agenda/Proposals

 

 

 

Board Vote
Recommendation

 

Page Reference
(for more detail)

•      Election of eleven directors

FOR ALL

 

11

 

•      Approval, on an advisory basis, of
  the compensation of our named
  executive officers

 

FOR

 

61

•      Ratification of Ernst & Young LLP
  as our independent registered
  public accounting firm for the year
  ending December 31, 2022

FOR

 

63

       Transact other business, if any, that
properly comes before the meeting

 

 

 

Election of Directors

 

Our directors are elected annually for one-year terms, and each of the nominees is currently serving as a director of Old Dominion. The nominees receiving a plurality of the votes cast at the meeting will be elected as directors. The graphics below highlight the backgrounds of our director nominees and the table below provides summary information about each director nominee.

 

        

 

          

 

8 of our 11 director nominees are independent

Our director nominees have an average tenure of 10 years

27% of our director nominees have self-identified gender, racial or ethnic diversity  

 

-2-

 


 

Election of Directors (continued)  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Committees

Name

 

Age

 

Director
Since

 

Occupation

 

Independent

 

AC

 

CC

 

GNC

David S. Congdon

 

65

 

1998

 

Executive Chairman of the Board of Directors, Old Dominion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sherry A. Aaholm

 

59

 

2018

 

Vice President and Chief Digital Officer, Cummins, Inc.

 

X

 

X

 

 

 

X

John R. Congdon, Jr.

 

65

 

1998

 

Private investor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bradley R. Gabosch

 

70

 

2016

 

Private investor

 

X

 

X

 

 

 

X

Greg C. Gantt

 

66

 

2018

 

President and Chief Executive Officer, Old Dominion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Patrick D. Hanley

 

77

 

2016

 

Private investor

 

X

 

X

 

X

 

 

John D. Kasarda, Ph.D.

 

76

 

2008

 

CEO and President of Aerotropolis Business Concepts LLC; President of Aerotropolis Institute China; Faculty, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Kenan-Flagler Business School

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

C

Wendy T. Stallings

 

47

 

2020

 

Owner and President, TPI Event Solutions, Inc.; Real estate investor

 

X

 

 

 

X

 

 

Thomas A.

Stith, III

 

58

 

2021

 

President, North Carolina

Community College System

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

X

Leo H. Suggs

 

82

 

2009

 

Private investor

 

X

 

 

 

C

 

X

D. Michael Wray

 

 

 

61

 

 

2008

 

President, Riverside Brick & Supply Company, Inc.

 

X

 

C

 

X

 

 

AC - Audit Committee

 

CC - Compensation Committee

GNC - Governance and Nomination Committee

 

C - Committee Chair

 

Approval, on an Advisory Basis, of the Compensation of our Named Executive Officers

We are asking our shareholders to approve, on a non-binding, advisory basis, the compensation of our named executive officers. The Board believes that our executive compensation policies are designed appropriately and are functioning as intended to align pay with performance and produce long-term value for our shareholders.

 

-3-

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiscal 2021 Executive Compensation Elements

Type

 

Form

 

General Purpose and Terms

Cash

 

Base Salary

 

Retention component that is reviewed annually and adjusted as needed, and executives are generally eligible for an annual increase.

 

 

Non-Equity
Performance
Incentive Plan
("PIP")

 

Motivates and rewards performance by linking a significant portion of compensation to profitability. Earned monthly based upon a fixed percentage, or participation factor, of our pre-tax income. No payment unless pre-tax income exceeds a required minimum performance threshold, and the aggregate PIP payments for each executive are limited to 10x the executive’s base salary.

Equity-

based

 

Performance-Based Restricted
Stock Award (“RSA”)

 

Aligns executive compensation with Company performance and shareholder value. Grants are awarded based on the Company’s operating ratio (a measure of profitability calculated by dividing total operating expenses by revenue). Any shares earned generally vest in increments of 33% per year on the anniversary of the grant date, subject to continued service requirements.

 

 

Performance-Based Restricted
Stock Unit Award (“PBRSU”)

 

Ties executive compensation to Company achievement of pre-tax income growth performance targets over a one-year performance period, with one-third of the award vesting following the conclusion of the performance period (to the extent the performance target is met) and an additional one-third of the award vesting on each anniversary thereafter, subject to continued service requirements.

Other
Employee
Benefits

 

401(k) Plan

 

Retirement plan with Company match; executive officers receive the same benefit as all employees.

 

 

Nonqualified
Deferred
Compensation
Plan

 

Self-funded retirement benefit; participants can defer significant percentages of annual base salary and monthly non-equity performance-based incentive compensation. No Company match or other contributions are provided by us.

Fiscal 2021 Compensation Decisions

 

The principal factors in the Compensation Committee’s executive compensation decisions for 2021 were (i) our financial performance, (ii) the relationship of executive compensation to the Company’s pre-tax income, (iii) the amount of compensation that is performance-based, (iv) the review and analysis conducted by its independent compensation consultant, (v) strong support received for “say-on-pay” voting results (approximately 94% of votes cast on the proposal at our 2021 Annual Meeting of Shareholders were in favor of such proposal), and (vi) shareholder feedback.

 

In October 2021, the Compensation Committee reviewed the compensation of our named executive officers and approved certain material changes, effective January 1, 2022, to the compensation arrangements for David Congdon, the Company’s Executive Chairman of the Board, and Greg Gantt, the Company’s President and Chief Executive Officer:

 

With respect to Mr. Congdon, the Compensation Committee approved the following changes that were further modifications to the previously disclosed multi-year approach of reduced pay levels across all pay components as part of the Company’s long-term succession planning: (i) his base salary was reduced by 24% from its 2021 level; (ii) his participation factor in the PIP used to determine his short-term incentive compensation was reduced by 46% from its 2021 level; and (iii) he will no longer receive stock-based compensation under the Old Dominion Freight Line, Inc. 2016 Stock Incentive Plan (the “2016 Plan”).

-4-

 


 

Fiscal 2021 Compensation Decisions (continued)

 

With respect to Mr. Gantt, the Compensation Committee approved an increase in his base salary to $920,000, to better align his base salary with competitive market levels for chief executive officers in our peer group.

 

We believe these compensation program changes further enhance the pay-for-performance focus of our executive compensation program, which underwent a significant redesign beginning in 2019 in response to shareholder feedback, and continue to strengthen the alignment of our executive compensation program with the long-term interests of our shareholders.

 

Fiscal 2021 Compensation Summary

The following table summarizes the compensation of our Chief Executive Officer, our Chief Financial Officer, and our next three most highly compensated executive officers who were serving at December 31, 2021, to whom we refer to collectively as our named executive officers, for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021.

Name

 

 

Salary ($)

 

Stock  Awards ($)

 

Non-Equity

Incentive Plan Compensation

($) (1)

 

Change in Pension Value and Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Earnings ($)

 

All Other

Compensation($)

 

Total

Compensation

($)

David S. Congdon

Executive Chairman of the Board

 

 

641,284

 

1,385,540

 

6,391,150

 

21,235

 

148,610

 

8,587,819

Greg C. Gantt

President and Chief Executive Officer

 

 

774,023

 

1,975,247

 

7,744,570

 

46,780

 

37,213

 

10,577,833

Adam N. Satterfield

Senior Vice President – Finance, Chief Financial Officer and Assistant Secretary

 

493,042

 

1,257,950

 

3,471,056

 

 

37,261

 

5,259,309


-5-

 


 

 

Fiscal 2021 Compensation Summary (continued)

Name

 

Salary ($)

 

Stock  Awards ($)

 

 

Non-Equity

Incentive Plan

Compensation

($) (1)

 

Change in Pension Value and Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Earnings ($)

 

All Other

Compensation

($)

 

 

 

Total

Compensation

($)

Kevin M. Freeman

Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer

 

 

583,168

 

 

 

 

1,488,187

 

4,165,267

 

4,601

 

25,546

6,266,769

 

 

Gregory B. Plemmons

Senior Vice President – Sales

 

478,432

 

816,548

 

2,499,160

 

1,046

 

24,665

 

3,819,851

 

 

 

(1)   The Non-Equity Incentive Plan Compensation payouts for Mr. Congdon and Mr. Gantt reflect reductions of approximately 10% and 7%, respectively, due to the PIP limit of 10x each executive’s base salary.

Ratification of the Appointment of our Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

As a matter of good corporate governance, we are asking our shareholders to ratify the appointment of Ernst & Young LLP as our independent registered public accounting firm for the year ending December 31, 2022.

2023 Annual Meeting

 

•    Shareholder proposals submitted pursuant to Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") Rule 14a-8 must be received by us by December 19, 2022.

 

•    Notice of shareholder proposals outside of SEC Rule 14a-8, including director nominations pursuant to the proxy access provisions of our bylaws, must be received by us no earlier than November 19, 2022 and no later than December 19, 2022.

 

 

 

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General Information

The accompanying proxy is solicited by and on behalf of our Board, and the entire cost of such solicitation will be borne by us. This solicitation is being made by mail and may also be made in person or by fax, telephone, or Internet by our officers or employees. In addition, arrangements will be made with brokerage houses and other custodians, nominees and fiduciaries to send proxy materials to their principals, and we will reimburse them for their reasonable expenses in connection therewith.

The accompanying proxy is for use at the 2022 Annual Meeting of Shareholders (the “Annual Meeting”) if a shareholder either will be unable to attend in person or will attend but wishes to vote by proxy. “Registered holders” who have shares registered in the owner's name through our transfer agent may vote by either: (i) completing the enclosed proxy card and mailing it in the postage-paid envelope provided; (ii) voting over the Internet by accessing the website identified on the proxy card and following the online instructions; or (iii) calling the toll-free telephone number identified on the proxy card. Proxies submitted via the Internet or by telephone must be received by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time on Tuesday, May 17, 2022.

For shares held in “street name,” that is, shares held in the name of a brokerage firm, bank or other nominee, you should receive a voting instruction form from that institution in lieu of a proxy card. The voting instruction form should indicate whether the institution has a process for beneficial holders to vote over the Internet or by telephone. Many banks and brokerage firms participate in the online program offered by Broadridge Financial Solutions, Inc. This program provides eligible shareholders who receive a paper copy of the proxy statement the opportunity to vote over the Internet or by telephone. The Broadridge Internet and telephone voting facilities will close at 11:59 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time on Tuesday, May 17, 2022. The Broadridge Internet and telephone voting procedures are designed to authenticate the shareholder's identity and to allow shareholders to vote their shares and confirm that their instructions have been properly recorded. If the voting instruction form does not reference Internet or telephone information, or if the shareholder prefers to vote by mail, please complete and return the paper voting instruction form in accordance with the instructions provided to you.

If you decide to attend the meeting in person, upon your arrival you will need to register with our receptionist in the main lobby of our principal executive offices at 500 Old Dominion Way, Thomasville, North Carolina 27360. Please be sure to have your state- or government-issued photo identification with you at the time of registration. After a determination that you are a registered holder of Old Dominion common stock as of the record date, you will be allowed to access the meeting room and attend our Annual Meeting. If you are not a registered shareholder but beneficially own shares of our common stock as of the record date, please be sure that you bring your state- or government-issued photo identification as well as either (i) a proxy issued to you in your name by your brokerage firm, bank or other nominee, or (ii) a brokerage statement showing your beneficial ownership of our common stock as of the record date (and a legal proxy from your brokerage firm, bank or other nominee if you wish to vote your shares at the Annual Meeting) to present to us at the time of registration. Please be aware that the meeting may be subject to in-person gathering restrictions. All meeting attendees will be required to comply with applicable health and safety protocols, which may include, but are not limited to, wearing an appropriate face covering at all times and maintaining a distance of six feet from other meeting attendees.

The Board of Directors has fixed March 10, 2022 as the record date for the determination of shareholders entitled to notice of and to vote at the Annual Meeting. On March 10, 2022, there were 113,761,155 outstanding shares of our common stock each entitled to one vote. The presence in person or by proxy of a majority of the shares of common stock outstanding on the record date constitutes a quorum for purposes of conducting business at the Annual Meeting. Shareholders do not have cumulative voting rights in the election of directors.

Brokers that are members of certain securities exchanges and that hold shares of our common stock in street name on behalf of beneficial owners have authority to vote on certain items when they have not received instructions from beneficial owners. Under the applicable rules governing such brokers, the proposal to ratify the appointment of our independent registered public accounting firm is considered

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a “discretionary” item. This means that brokers may vote using their discretion on this proposal on behalf of beneficial owners who have not furnished voting instructions. In contrast, certain items are considered “non-discretionary,” and a “broker non-vote” occurs when brokers do not receive voting instructions from beneficial owners with respect to such items because the brokers are not entitled to vote such uninstructed shares. The proposals to elect directors and approve, on an advisory basis, the compensation of our named executive officers are considered “non-discretionary,” which means that brokers cannot vote your uninstructed shares when they do not receive voting instructions from you.

Assuming the existence of a quorum at the Annual Meeting, the voting options for each proposal presented in this proxy statement, as well as the vote required to approve each proposal at the Annual Meeting, are as follows:

Proposal 1 - Election of Directors: With respect to this proposal, you may cast your vote “for all,” “withhold all,” or “for all except” with respect to the director nominees. The nominees receiving a plurality of the votes cast will be elected as directors.

Proposal 2 - Approval, on an Advisory Basis, of the Compensation of Our Named Executive Officers: With respect to this proposal (the results of which will not be binding upon Old Dominion or the Board), you may vote “for,” “against,” or “abstain” from voting. For this non-binding vote to be approved by the shareholders, the votes cast “for” this proposal must exceed the votes cast “against” this proposal.

Proposal 3 - Ratification of the Appointment of Our Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm: With respect to this proposal, you may vote “for,” “against,” or “abstain” from voting. For this proposal to be approved by the shareholders, the votes cast “for” this proposal must exceed the votes cast “against” this proposal.

Abstentions, shares that are withheld as to voting, and broker non-votes (if any) will be counted for determining the existence of a quorum, but will not be counted as a vote cast with respect to any of these proposals and, therefore, will have no effect on the outcome of the vote for any of these proposals presented at the Annual Meeting.

Where a choice is specified on any proxy as to the vote on any matter to come before the Annual Meeting, the proxy will be voted in accordance with such specification. If no specification is made but the proxy is otherwise properly completed, the shares represented thereby will be voted “for” the election of the director nominees named in this proxy statement, “for” the approval, on an advisory basis, of the compensation of our named executive officers, and “for” the ratification of the appointment of our independent registered public accounting firm. Any shareholder submitting the accompanying proxy has the right to revoke it by notifying our Corporate Secretary in writing at any time prior to the voting of the proxy. A proxy is suspended if the person giving the proxy properly elects to vote in person and attends the Annual Meeting.

Management is not aware of any matters, other than those specified above, that will be presented for action at the Annual Meeting. If any other matters do properly come before the Annual Meeting, the persons named as agents in the proxy will vote upon such matters in accordance with their best judgment.

 

 


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SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF MANAGEMENT AND CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS

The following table sets forth information with respect to the beneficial ownership of our common stock, $0.10 par value, our only class of voting security, as of March 10, 2022, or such other date as indicated in the footnotes to the table, for: (i) each person known by us to own beneficially more than five percent of our common stock; (ii) each director; (iii) each named executive officer and each of the other executive officers; and (iv) all directors, the named executive officers and all of the other executive officers as a group. Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with the rules of the SEC. Unless otherwise indicated, the address of all listed shareholders is c/o Old Dominion Freight Line, Inc., 500 Old Dominion Way, Thomasville, NC 27360. As of March 10, 2022, and in compliance with our securities trading policy, none of our directors or executive officers have pledged our common stock.

 

Name and Address of Beneficial Owner

 

Shares Beneficially Owned (1)

 

 

Percent

 

The Vanguard Group (2)

100 Vanguard Boulevard

Malvern, PA 19355

 

    

10,746,615

 

 

   9.4%

 

BlackRock, Inc. (3)

55 East 52nd Street

New York, NY 10055

 

 

10,008,078

 

 

   8.8%

 

Capital Research Global Investors (4)

333 South Hope Street, 55th Floor

Los Angeles, CA 90071

 

 

6,511,245

 

 

   5.7%

 

David S. Congdon (5)

 

 

6,391,158

 

 

   5.6%

 

John R. Congdon, Jr. (6)

 

 

5,073,764

 

 

   4.5%

 

Greg C. Gantt (7)

 

 

37,059

 

 

 

*

 

Adam N. Satterfield (8)

 

 

28,579

 

 

 

*

 

Kevin M. Freeman (9)

 

 

24,659

 

 

 

*

 

Cecil E. Overbey, Jr. (10)

 

 

19,793

 

 

 

*

 

Ross H. Parr (11)

 

 

16,235

 

 

 

*

 

Christopher T. Brooks (12)

 

 

14,940

 

 

 

*

 

John D. Kasarda

 

 

13,720

 

 

 

*

 

David J. Bates (13)

 

 

13,252

 

 

 

*

 

Gregory B. Plemmons (14)

 

 

12,173

 

 

 

*

 

D. Michael Wray

 

 

8,984

 

 

 

*

 

Bradley R. Gabosch

 

 

7,972

 

 

 

*

 

Patrick D. Hanley

 

 

7,972

 

 

 

*

 

Sherry A. Aaholm

 

 

4,006

 

 

 

*

 

Leo H. Suggs

 

 

3,772

 

 

 

*

 

Wendy T. Stallings

 

1,545

 

 

 

*

 

Thomas A. Stith, III

 

545

 

 

 

*

All Directors, the Named Executive Officers and all of the other Executive Officers as a Group (18 persons)

 

11,680,128

 

 

 

10.3%

_______________

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*

Less than 1%

(1)

Except as indicated in the footnotes to this table and under applicable community property laws, each shareholder named has sole voting and dispositive power with respect to the shares set forth opposite the shareholder’s name. Beneficial ownership was determined from public filings, representations by the named shareholders and the Old Dominion Freight Line, Inc. 401(k) Plan.

(2)

Information was obtained from a Schedule 13G/A filed on February 10, 2022 with the SEC by The Vanguard Group (“Vanguard”). Vanguard reported: (i) sole power to dispose of, or direct the

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disposition of, 10,348,868 shares; (ii) shared power to vote, or direct the vote of, 163,422 shares; and (iii) shared power to dispose of, or direct the disposition of, 397,747 shares.

(3)

Information was obtained from a Schedule 13G/A filed on February 1, 2022 with the SEC by BlackRock, Inc. (“BlackRock”). BlackRock reported sole power to vote, or direct the vote of, 8,930,863 shares, and sole power to dispose of, or direct the disposition of, 10,008,078 shares. As reported, various persons have the right to receive, or the power to direct the receipt of, dividends from, or the proceeds from the sale of, the shares. No one person’s interest in the shares is greater than five percent of the total outstanding common shares.

(4)

Information was obtained from a Schedule 13G/A filed on February 11, 2022 with the SEC by Capital Research Global Investors (“Capital Research”). Capital Research reported sole power to vote, or direct the vote of, 6,503,898 shares, and sole power to dispose of, or direct the disposition of, 6,511,245 shares. Capital Research has disclaimed beneficial ownership of these shares pursuant to Rule 13d-4 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”).

(5)

Includes: (i) 11,477 shares held directly by David S. Congdon; (ii) 86,616 shares held in Mr. Congdon’s 401(k) retirement plan; (iii) 2,224,990 shares held as trustee of various family trusts; (iv) 1,893,663 shares held through shared voting and investment rights as co-trustee of various family trusts; (v) 1,756,546 shares held through shared voting and investment rights with the shareholder’s spouse as trustee of various family trusts; and (vi) 417,866 shares beneficially owned by certain other family members through various trusts. Excludes 5,500 earned and unvested PBRSUs.

(6)

Includes: (i) 545 shares held directly by John R. Congdon, Jr.; (ii) 2,099,038 shares held as trustee of various family trusts; (iii) 387,411 shares held through shared voting and investment rights as co-trustee of various family trusts; (iv) 69,239 shares held by the shareholder’s spouse as trustee of various family trusts; and (v) 1,823,627 shares held by another trust of the shareholder. This amount also includes 693,904 shares held by a GRAT Remainder Trust, with respect to which John R. Congdon, Jr. disclaims beneficial ownership.

(7)

Includes 7,728 shares owned in Mr. Gantt’s 401(k) retirement plan. Excludes 7,026 earned and unvested PBRSUs.

(8)

Includes 10,296 shares owned in Mr. Satterfield’s 401(k) retirement plan. Excludes 4,475 earned and unvested PBRSUs.

(9)

Includes 4,697 shares owned in Mr. Freeman’s 401(k) retirement plan. Excludes 5,294 earned and unvested PBRSUs.

(10)

Includes 3,893 shares owned in Mr. Overbey’s 401(k) retirement plan. Excludes 2,069 earned and unvested PBRSUs.

(11)

Includes 305 shares owned in Mr. Parr’s 401(k) retirement plan. Excludes 2,069 earned and unvested PBRSUs.

(12)

Includes 384 shares owned in Mr. Brooks’ 401(k) retirement plan. Excludes 2,069 earned and unvested PBRSUs.

(13)

Includes 495 shares owned in Mr. Bates’ 401(k) retirement plan. Excludes 2,069 earned and unvested PBRSUs.

(14)

Includes 365 shares owned in Mr. Plemmons’ 401(k) retirement plan. Excludes 2,069 earned and unvested PBRSUs.

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Proposal 1 - Election of Directors

Our Bylaws currently provide that the number of directors shall be not less than five nor more than twelve. Our Board of Directors, upon the recommendation of its Governance and Nomination Committee, has determined that the Board shall consist of eleven directors. Unless authority is withheld, it is intended that proxies received in response to this solicitation will be voted in favor of the nominees. In accordance with its charter and our Corporate Governance Guidelines, the Governance and Nomination Committee has recommended, and the Board has approved, the eleven individuals named below to serve as directors until our next annual meeting and until their respective successors have been elected and qualified or until their death, resignation, removal or disqualification or until there is a decrease in the number of directors. The age and a brief biographical description of each director nominee, his or her position with us, certain board memberships, and the nominee’s specific experience, qualifications, attributes, skills, diversity characteristics or other factors that led our Board to conclude that the candidate is well-qualified to serve as a member of our Board are set forth below. This information and certain information regarding beneficial ownership of securities by such nominees contained in this proxy statement has been furnished to us by the nominees or obtained from filings with the SEC. All of the nominees have consented to serve as directors, if elected.

David S. Congdon (65) was appointed Executive Chairman of the Board effective May 2018, having previously served as Vice Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer from May 2015 to May 2018, and President and Chief Executive Officer from January 2008 to April 2015. He was our President and Chief Operating Officer from May 1997 to December 2007 and served in various positions in operations, maintenance and engineering between 1978 and 1997. He was first elected a director in 1998 and is the cousin of John R. Congdon, Jr., who also serves on the Board. Mr. Congdon, through his more than 40 years of service to us, including 24 years of service as an executive officer of Old Dominion, has played a critical role in helping us develop our strategic plan and grow our operations through geographic expansion and acquisitions. He has experience leading us through difficult operating conditions and has helped guide Old Dominion to sustained profitability and significant growth in shareholder value. The Board benefits from Mr. Congdon’s critical knowledge of the less-than-truckload (“LTL”) industry, as well as his deep understanding of the operational and regulatory complexities that we must address as a publicly-traded transportation company.

Greg C. Gantt (66) was first elected as a director in 2018. He has served as our President and Chief Executive Officer since May 2018 and previously served as our President and Chief Operating Officer from May 2015 to May 2018. He was our Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer from June 2011 to May 2015, and served as our Senior Vice President - Operations from January 2002 to June 2011. He joined us in November 1994 and was one of our regional Vice Presidents until January 2002. Prior to his employment with us, Mr. Gantt served in many operational capacities with Carolina Freight Carriers Corporation, including Vice President of its Southern Region. Mr. Gantt, through his ever-increasing roles and responsibilities with us over the past 27 years, has played a critical role in the development of our operational plan and brings to the Board significant expertise in LTL industry leadership and business strategy.

Sherry A. Aaholm (59) was first elected as a director in 2018. Since April 2021, Ms. Aaholm has served as Vice President and Chief Digital Officer of Cummins, Inc. (NYSE: CMI), a global power leader and a corporation of complementary business segments that design, manufacture, distribute and service a broad portfolio of power solutions, where she previously served as Vice President - Chief Information Officer from June 2013 to March 2021. From August 1999 to December 2012, Ms. Aaholm served as Executive Vice President, Information Technology of FedEx Services. The Board benefits from Ms. Aaholm’s graduate degree in sustainability as well as her over 33 years of overseeing mission-critical information systems, extensive experience in technology and information security, and development of digital/Internet of Things (IoT) and prognostics solutions for manufacturing and physical products, including in the transportation and logistics industries.

John R. Congdon, Jr. (65) was first elected as a director in 1998. He is the cousin of David S. Congdon, the Company’s Executive Chairman of the Board. Prior to their acquisition by Penske Truck

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Leasing in July 2017, Mr. Congdon served as the Chairman of the Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer for each of Old Dominion Truck Leasing, Inc. and Dominion Dedicated Logistics, Inc. Mr. Congdon has over 40 years of experience in the trucking industry and brings to the Board extensive knowledge of dedicated logistics, fleet management services and the purchase and sale of equipment. Having previously served as chairman of a board, Mr. Congdon also brings experience in board management.

Bradley R. Gabosch (70) was first elected as a director in 2016. Mr. Gabosch previously served as Managing Director for the public accounting firm Grant Thornton LLP from August 2014 to May 2016. Mr. Gabosch also served in various positions at Grant Thornton LLP, including as Carolinas Managing Partner, from October 2009 until his retirement as partner in July 2013. He has over 43 years of experience in the public accounting profession, of which 29 years were spent as an audit partner. Mr. Gabosch brings to the Board extensive knowledge of accounting and management and a strong understanding of financial statement oversight and disclosure matters.

Patrick D. Hanley (77) was first elected as a director in 2016. Mr. Hanley has an extensive history in the trucking industry having most recently served as Senior Vice President - Finance and Accounting of UPS Freight (formerly Overnite Corporation and now known as TForce Freight, a subsidiary of TFI International) from August 2005 to October 2007. Mr. Hanley also served on the board of directors of Overnite Corporation and as Director, Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of its subsidiary Overnite Transportation from June 1996 to August 2005. Prior to such roles, Mr. Hanley served in various senior financial positions at Union Pacific Resources Group and Union Pacific Corporation. Mr. Hanley has served on the Board of Directors of NewMarket Corporation (NYSE: NEU), which develops, manufactures, blends and delivers chemical additives that enhance the performance of petroleum products, since 2004. Mr. Hanley served as Chairman of the Board of Directors of Gallium Technologies, LLC from January 2011 to January 2016, having previously served as its President and Chief Executive Officer from July 2009 to January 2011. He also served on the Board of Directors for Xenith Bankshares, Inc. from January 2010 to July 2016. Mr. Hanley brings to the Board significant knowledge in the management and oversight of public companies and significant leadership experience in accounting and finance within the trucking industry.

John D. Kasarda, Ph.D. (76) was first elected as a director in 2008. Dr. Kasarda serves as the President and Chief Executive Officer of Aerotropolis Business Concepts LLC and the President of Aerotropolis Institute China. Dr. Kasarda also serves on the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Kenan-Flagler Business School. He is considered the leading developer of the aerotropolis concept, which brings together air logistics and surface transportation to foster airport-linked business development. He is the former Editor-in-Chief of Logistics, an international journal of transportation and supply chain management, and brings a unique perspective and creative insights to our Board due to his breadth of knowledge in business strategy, transportation, logistics, and global supply chain management, combined with his thought leadership and worldwide experiences in the transportation industry.

Wendy T. Stallings (47) was first elected as a director in 2020. Ms. Stallings is a real estate investor and the sole owner of TPI Event Solutions, Inc., a full-service event management company specializing in catering, hospitality, corporate events, merchandise and contract fulfillment, where she has served as President since December 2000. She was also the co-owner of Excel Learning Centers, a children’s early learning program with campuses located throughout North Carolina, where she served as Vice President from March 2006 until the sale of the business in August 2021. The Board benefits from Ms. Stallings’ law degree as well as her comprehensive expertise in entrepreneurship, strategic planning, customer relations and business management.

Thomas A. Stith, III (58) was first elected as a director in 2021. Since January 2021, Mr. Stith has served as President of the North Carolina Community College System, where, as chief administrative officer of the system, he provides policy oversight and guidelines for the 58 community and technical colleges in the system. From September 2019 to December 2020, Mr. Stith served as District Director of the U.S. Small Business Administration (“SBA”), with responsibility, as the SBA’s senior representative in North Carolina, for developing and implementing the District Office Strategic Plan while directing and

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managing all SBA programs within North Carolina. From January 2017 to September 2019, Mr. Stith was the Chief Executive Officer and co-founder of The Michael Thomas Group, a firm focused on consulting and advising clients seeking business development opportunities in the public and private sectors. From January 2013 to December 2016, Mr. Stith served as Chief of Staff to North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory, in which role he advised and made recommendations to the Governor on public policy, budget, and state government operations matters. The Board benefits from Mr. Stith’s extensive experience in public policy and administration, diversity and inclusion and legislative affairs.

Leo H. Suggs (82) was first elected as a director in 2009 and has served as our Lead Independent Director since December 2018. Mr. Suggs has a long and distinguished career in the trucking industry that began in 1958, holding a wide range of positions that included Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Overnite Transportation from 1996 to 2005 and President and Chief Executive Officer of UPS Freight from 2005 to 2006. As President and Chief Executive Officer of Overnite Transportation, and as a member of its Board of Directors from November 2003 to May 2005, Mr. Suggs gained extensive knowledge about managing a union-free motor carrier in the LTL industry. He understands the opportunities and challenges associated with the LTL industry, and has first-hand knowledge of merger and acquisition considerations and strategies. We believe that Mr. Suggs is invaluable to our Board as an adviser on logistics services and LTL operations.

D. Michael Wray (61) was first elected as a director in 2008. Mr. Wray is the President of Riverside Brick & Supply Company, Inc., a distributor of masonry materials in central Virginia. Mr. Wray has served in that position since 1998 and was formerly its Vice President and General Manager from 1996 to 1998. From 1992 to 1995, Mr. Wray was employed by Ruff Hewn, Inc., an apparel designer and manufacturer, where he held positions including Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer. Mr. Wray also served in various audit and management positions with Price Waterhouse from 1982 to 1992. The Board benefits from his experience in public accounting, which includes experience with the transportation industry. In addition, he has extensive knowledge of accounting and a valuable understanding of financial statement oversight and disclosure considerations gained from his experience as a chief financial officer. Mr. Wray also brings company leadership and business management expertise to his service on our Board due to his ongoing responsibilities as President of Riverside Brick & Supply Company, Inc.

The nominees receiving a plurality of the votes cast will be elected as directors.

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS UNANIMOUSLY RECOMMENDS A VOTE “FOR” THE ELECTION OF EACH OF THE NOMINEES IDENTIFIED ABOVE.

Executive Officers

The following provides certain information about our executive officers who are not directors or nominees:

David J. Bates (57) was appointed Senior Vice President - Operations in October 2011 after serving as our Vice President - Central States Region since July 2007. From March 2002 to July 2007, Mr. Bates served as our service center manager in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Mr. Bates has also served in various other positions in operations with Old Dominion since joining us in December 1995.

Christopher T. Brooks (51) was appointed Senior Vice President - Human Resources & Safety effective January 2018 after serving as our Vice President - Human Resources from June 2015 to December 2017. Prior to joining us, he served as Senior Vice President of Human Resources at National General Insurance (which was acquired by The Allstate Corporation in 2021) from January 2015 to June 2015 after serving as that company’s Vice President of Human Resources from January 2010 to December 2014.

Kevin M. Freeman (63) was appointed Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer effective May 2018 after serving as our Senior Vice President - Sales from January 2011 to May 2018

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and Vice President of Field Sales from May 1997 to December 2010. Mr. Freeman has 42 years of experience in the transportation industry, and has held various positions in sales with Old Dominion since joining us in February 1992.

Cecil E. Overbey, Jr. (60) was appointed Senior Vice President - Strategic Development in January 2011 after serving as our Vice President of National Accounts and Marketing since July 2000. Mr. Overbey has 36 years of experience in the transportation and distribution industries, and since joining us in June 1995 as a National Account Executive, has held various other management positions in sales and marketing with Old Dominion.

Ross H. Parr (50) was appointed Senior Vice President - Legal Affairs, General Counsel and Secretary effective January 2016, after serving as our Vice President - Legal Affairs, General Counsel and Secretary since May 2012. Mr. Parr joined us in August 2011 and served as our Vice President, Deputy General Counsel and Assistant Secretary until May 2012. From August 2003 to December 2007 Mr. Parr was an associate, and from January 2008 to August 2011 he was a member, at the law firm Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice (now known as Womble Bond Dickinson (US) LLP).

Gregory B. Plemmons (57) was appointed Senior Vice President – Sales effective January 2019, after serving as our Vice President – Field Sales since September 2013. He also served as our Vice President – OD Global from December 2002 to September 2013. Mr. Plemmons has 33 years of experience in the transportation industry, and has served Old Dominion in various other positions in sales since joining us in April 1997.

Adam N. Satterfield (47) was appointed Senior Vice President - Finance, Chief Financial Officer and Assistant Secretary effective January 2016, after serving as our Vice President - Treasurer since June 2011. Mr. Satterfield also served as our Director - Finance and Accounting from August 2007 to June 2011 and as our Manager - SEC Reporting from October 2004 to August 2007. Prior to joining us in October 2004, he was an Audit Manager with KPMG LLP, a global accounting firm. Mr. Satterfield is a Certified Public Accountant.

Corporate Governance

Board Leadership Structure

Historically, our Chairman of the Board has also served as our Chief Executive Officer, and these dual roles were held for many years by Earl E. Congdon, who now serves as Chairman Emeritus and Senior Advisor to the Company. In 2007, however, following Earl E. Congdon's decision to resign from the Chief Executive Officer position effective on January 1, 2008, the Board determined that it was in the best interests of our shareholders to appoint David S. Congdon, who had been serving as our President and Chief Operating Officer, as our Chief Executive Officer and to redesignate Earl E. Congdon as Executive Chairman of the Board. The Board took these actions because it wanted to preserve the ability of a former Chief Executive Officer to continue to have a significant executive role on our management team. This objective was further maintained with the transitions of David S. Congdon to Executive Chairman and Earl E. Congdon to Senior Executive Chairman as part of the Board’s designed succession plan effective May 2018. Earl E. Congdon retired from our Board effective January 1, 2021 and ceased to serve as Senior Executive Chairman on such date.

The Board also believes that strong, independent Board leadership is an important aspect of effective corporate governance and, as a result, appointed a Lead Independent Director in January 2010. Leo H. Suggs has served in such role since December 2018. Our Lead Independent Director's responsibilities and authority include presiding at meetings of our independent directors, coordinating with our Executive Chairman and our Chief Executive Officer on Board meeting agendas, schedules and materials and otherwise acting as a liaison between the independent directors, our Executive Chairman and our Chief Executive Officer. For these reasons, the Board believes that this leadership structure is appropriate for us. The Board believes that there is no specific generally accepted leadership structure that applies to all companies, nor is there one specific leadership structure that permanently suits us. As a

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result, our decision as to whether to combine, separate or add to the positions of Chairman and Chief Executive Officer and whether to have a Lead Independent Director may vary from time to time, as industry or our own conditions and circumstances warrant. The independent directors of the Board consider the Board's leadership structure on an annual basis to determine the structure that is most appropriate for the governance of Old Dominion.

Independent Directors

In accordance with the listing standards of The Nasdaq Stock Market, LLC (“Nasdaq”), our Board must consist of a majority of independent directors. The Board, upon the recommendation of the Governance and Nomination Committee, has determined that current directors Ms. Aaholm, Mr. Gabosch, Mr. Hanley, Dr. Kasarda, Ms. Stallings, Mr. Stith, Mr. Suggs and Mr. Wray are each independent in accordance with Nasdaq listing standards. The Board performed a review to determine the independence of its members and made a subjective determination as to each that no transactions, relationships or arrangements exist that, in the opinion of the Board, would interfere with the exercise of independent judgment in carrying out the responsibilities of a director of Old Dominion. In making these determinations, the Board considered information provided by the directors, in addition to information obtained by us, with regard to each individual's business and personal activities as they may relate to us and our management. Our Corporate Governance Guidelines direct the independent directors of the Board to meet in executive session at least twice each year, and they met four times in 2021. Shareholders may communicate with the independent directors by following the procedures set forth in “Shareholder Communications with the Board” in this proxy statement.

Attendance and Committees of the Board

Pursuant to our Corporate Governance Guidelines, directors are expected to attend the Annual Meeting and all meetings of the Board, including all meetings of Board committees of which they are members. All of our directors were present at our 2021 Annual Meeting of Shareholders that was held on May 19, 2021. Our Board of Directors held seven meetings during 2021. The Board of Directors has three standing committees: the Audit Committee, the Compensation Committee and the Governance and Nomination Committee. Each member of the Audit Committee, the Compensation Committee and the Governance and Nomination Committee is an “independent director” as such term is defined under applicable SEC rules and regulations and Nasdaq listing standards. In 2021, all of our directors attended at least 75% of the aggregate meetings held by the Board and their assigned committees during the period for which they served on the Board or such committees.

Audit Committee

The Audit Committee, which is a separately-designated standing Audit Committee established in accordance with section 3(a)(58)(A) of the Exchange Act, currently consists of D. Michael Wray (Chair), Sherry A. Aaholm, Bradley R. Gabosch, and Patrick D. Hanley, each of whom the Board has determined is independent pursuant to applicable SEC rules and regulations and Nasdaq listing standards. The Board has determined that all Audit Committee members are financially literate and that Mr. Gabosch, Mr. Hanley and Mr. Wray each qualify as an “audit committee financial expert” as defined by applicable SEC rules. Please refer to the experience described for each of these members under “Proposal 1 - Election of Directors” in this proxy statement.

The Audit Committee is governed by a written charter approved by the Board, which is available on our website at https://ir.odfl.com/governance-docs. The Committee annually reviews this charter to reassess its adequacy and recommends any proposed changes to the Board for approval. Committee members are nominated annually by the Governance and Nomination Committee and approved by our Board to serve for one-year terms. Information regarding the functions performed by this committee is set forth in the “Report of Audit Committee,” which is included in this proxy statement. In fulfilling its duties, the Audit Committee, among other things, appoints, compensates and oversees the work of the independent registered public accounting firm. In addition, our Risk Management and Compliance Departments report to the Audit Committee on the assessment and mitigation of key risk and compliance

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matters across our business, our Internal Audit Department reports to the Audit Committee on its audit plan and our audit-related processes and procedures and internal controls, and our OD Technology Department reports to the Audit Committee on our cybersecurity, technology and data privacy initiatives. The Audit Committee met eleven times in 2021. The Audit Committee holds telephonic meetings after each quarterly period to discuss with both management and our independent registered public accounting firm, Ernst & Young LLP (“EY”), the financial results to be included in our periodic filings with the SEC prior to their release.

Compensation Committee

Our Compensation Committee currently consists of Leo H. Suggs (Chair), Patrick D. Hanley, Wendy T. Stallings and D. Michael Wray, each of whom the Board has determined to be independent pursuant to applicable SEC rules and regulations and Nasdaq listing standards. Committee members are nominated annually by the Governance and Nomination Committee and approved by our Board to serve for one-year terms.

The Compensation Committee is responsible for reviewing the components of our compensation plans for our officers, including an evaluation of the components of compensation, the standards of performance measurements and the relationship between performance and compensation. The Compensation Committee is also responsible for reviewing the results of our most recent “say-on-pay” vote and any shareholder feedback from our shareholder outreach initiatives, and also determines whether any adjustments to our compensation policies and practices are necessary or appropriate in light of such “say-on-pay” vote or shareholder feedback. In addition, the Compensation Committee regularly engages with our management team regarding the Company’s human capital programs, including employee diversity and inclusion initiatives. Please refer to our compensation philosophy described in the “Compensation Discussion and Analysis” section of this proxy statement for further discussion, including the role of executive officers in determining or recommending the amount or form of executive and non-employee director compensation. The Compensation Committee also reviews and evaluates our non-employee director compensation program, and recommends changes as deemed necessary to maintain alignment with our compensation philosophy.

The Compensation Committee is governed by a written charter approved by the Board, which is available on our website at https://ir.odfl.com/governance-docs. The Committee annually reviews this charter to reassess its adequacy and recommends any proposed changes to the Board for approval. The Committee meets periodically and is authorized to obtain opinions or reports from external or internal sources as it may deem appropriate or necessary to assist and advise it in connection with its responsibilities. The Compensation Committee met six times in 2021. In addition, the Chair of the Compensation Committee meets periodically with our Executive Chairman and our Chief Executive Officer to review and evaluate our executive compensation program and the relationship between performance and compensation. In accordance with its charter, the Committee may delegate authority to one or more members of the Committee as deemed necessary to fulfill its responsibilities. No such authority was delegated in 2021.

To assist the Compensation Committee with its review and analysis of executive, non-employee director and employee compensation matters, the Compensation Committee has engaged the services of an independent compensation consulting firm, Pearl Meyer & Partners, LLC (“Pearl Meyer”), periodically since 2013. In 2020 and 2021, the Compensation Committee engaged Pearl Meyer to review and analyze our executive compensation program and conduct a peer group assessment, as well as assess and consider any shareholder outreach matters and shareholder advisory group observations. In addition, in 2021, the Compensation Committee also engaged Pearl Meyer to review and analyze the competitiveness of our non-employee director program, including how our program and performance compared to those of our peer group. For a more detailed discussion of the nature and scope of the role of Pearl Meyer with respect to our compensation programs, please see “Compensation Discussion and Analysis - Role of Compensation Consultant” and “Director Compensation - Components of Compensation” below.

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Governance and Nomination Committee

The Governance and Nomination Committee currently consists of John D. Kasarda (Chair), Sherry A. Aaholm, Bradley R. Gabosch, Thomas A. Stith, III and Leo H. Suggs, each of whom the Board has determined is independent pursuant to applicable Nasdaq listing standards. This Committee makes recommendations concerning the size and composition of the Board of Directors; evaluates and recommends candidates for election as directors (including nominees recommended by shareholders); coordinates the orientation (in conjunction with our Executive Chairman and our Chief Executive Officer) and educational opportunities for new and existing directors; assesses, with the assistance of our Compliance Department, environmental, social and governance (“ESG”) matters; and develops and implements our corporate governance policies. We also maintain a corporate membership in the National Association of Corporate Directors (“NACD”), which provides our Board members with opportunities and resources to continue to enhance their knowledge of current governance best practices and emerging issues faced by public company directors.

The Governance and Nomination Committee is responsible for overseeing the annual self-evaluation process of the Board and its committees, which is used by the Board and each committee to assess effectiveness, performance and opportunities for improvement. The Governance and Nomination Committee reports its findings and any recommendations to the Board. During 2021, the Board and committee evaluation process involved the distribution of a self-assessment questionnaire to all Board and committee members inviting a review and written comments on all aspects of the Board and each committee’s composition, role and responsibilities, as well as director performance and Board dynamics. For both the Board and the relevant committee, the process solicited ideas from directors about (i) improving quality of Board and committee discussions on key matters, (ii) identifying specific issues that should be discussed in the future, and (iii) identifying any other matters of importance to the proper functioning of the Board or relevant committee.

The Governance and Nomination Committee is governed by a written charter approved by the Board, which is available on our website at https://ir.odfl.com/governance-docs. The Committee annually reviews this charter to reassess its adequacy and recommends any proposed changes to the Board for approval. Committee members are appointed annually by a majority of the Board to serve for one-year terms. The Governance and Nomination Committee met four times in 2021.

Corporate Governance Guidelines

The Board has adopted written Corporate Governance Guidelines, which provide the framework for fulfillment of the Board's duties and responsibilities in light of various best practices in corporate governance and applicable laws and regulations. The Corporate Governance Guidelines address a number of matters applicable to directors, including director qualification standards, our withhold vote policy, meeting requirements and responsibilities of the Board and its committees. The Corporate Governance Guidelines are available on our website at https://ir.odfl.com/governance-docs.

Code of Business Conduct

We have adopted a Code of Business Conduct that applies to all of our directors, officers (including our Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, principal accounting officer and any person performing similar functions) and employees. Our Code of Business Conduct is available on our website at https://ir.odfl.com/governance-docs. To the extent permissible under applicable law, the rules of the SEC and Nasdaq listing standards, we intend to disclose on our website any amendment to our Code of Business Conduct, or any grant of a waiver from a provision of our Code of Business Conduct, that requires disclosure under applicable law, the rules of the SEC or Nasdaq listing standards.

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Shareholder Communications with the Board

Any shareholder desiring to contact the Board or any individual director serving on the Board may do so by written communication mailed to: Board of Directors (Attention: (name of director(s), as applicable)), care of the Corporate Secretary, Old Dominion Freight Line, Inc., 500 Old Dominion Way, Thomasville, North Carolina 27360. Any communication so received will be processed by our Corporate Secretary and be promptly delivered to the appropriate member(s) of the Board.

Director Nominations

The Governance and Nomination Committee will consider qualified director nominees recommended by shareholders when such recommendations are submitted in accordance with our bylaws and policies regarding director nominations. Shareholders may submit in writing the names and qualifications of potential director nominees to our Corporate Secretary (500 Old Dominion Way, Thomasville, North Carolina 27360) for delivery to the Chair of the Governance and Nomination Committee for consideration. When submitting a nomination to the Governance and Nomination Committee for consideration, a shareholder must provide the following minimum information for each director nominee: (i) full name, age, business address and, if known, residence address; (ii) principal occupation or employment; (iii) number of our shares of common stock beneficially owned; (iv) all information relating to such person that would be required to be disclosed in a proxy statement for the election of directors (including such person's written consent to being named in the proxy statement as a nominee and serving as a director if elected); and (v) a description of all direct and indirect compensation or other material monetary agreements during the past three years, and any other material relationships between or among the nominating shareholder (and his/her respective affiliates and associates) and the director nominee (and his/her respective affiliates and associates). The shareholder's nomination must also include, among other things, information regarding that shareholder's economic, voting and other interests that may be material to our and our shareholders' evaluation of the director nominee.

Shareholder nominations for director must also be made in a timely manner and otherwise in accordance with our bylaws, as described in more detail in Article 3 of our bylaws. If the Governance and Nomination Committee receives a director nomination from a shareholder or group of shareholders who (individually or in the aggregate) have beneficially owned greater than 5% of our outstanding stock for at least one year prior to the date of nomination, we, to the extent required by applicable securities law, will identify the candidate and shareholder or group of shareholders recommending the candidate and will disclose in our proxy statement whether the Governance and Nomination Committee chose to nominate the candidate, as well as certain other information required by SEC rules and regulations. Shareholders may also nominate and include in our annual proxy materials a candidate for election as a director at our annual meeting of shareholders pursuant to the proxy access provisions described in Article 3, Section 7 of our bylaws, subject to certain limitations and provided that the requirements set forth in our bylaws are satisfied.

In addition to any director nominees submitted by shareholders, the Governance and Nomination Committee considers any candidates submitted by directors, as well as self-nominations by directors, and it also may consider candidates submitted by a third-party search firm hired for the purpose of identifying director candidates. From time to time the Governance and Nomination Committee may also consider candidates identified through outside networks or other sources focused on diversity in gender, race, ethnicity, culture/viewpoint, geography, or other qualities or attributes that the Governance and Nomination Committee believes are important in evaluating qualified director candidates. The Governance and Nomination Committee investigates potential director candidates and their individual qualifications, and all such candidates, including those submitted by shareholders, are similarly evaluated by the Governance and Nomination Committee.

In evaluating prospective nominees, the Governance and Nomination Committee considers the criteria outlined in our Corporate Governance Guidelines, which include personal and professional ethics, integrity and values; director independence; relevant educational and business experience; willingness to devote the time required to fulfill the duties of a director and to develop additional insight into our

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operations; and a willingness to represent the best interests of us and our shareholders and be objective in evaluating management's effectiveness. The Governance and Nomination Committee also considers various specific skills, attributes and qualities of prospective nominees, as well as current Board members, that are particularly relevant to our business and a strong and effective Board, which include the following:

 

Industry - Extensive knowledge and experience in the freight transportation and logistics industry;

 

Executive Management - Senior level experience in operations, strategic planning, risk management and oversight, finance/accounting and economics, and/or treasury and securities markets;

 

Diversity – Self-identified diversity characteristics (including with respect to gender, race, ethnicity and national origin);

 

Human Resources and Safety - Knowledge of employee relations, safety and environmental issues;

 

Shareholder Relations - Understanding of public company governance and institutional investor considerations;

 

Customer Relations - Insight into marketing, sales and customer relationship management;

 

Information Technology - Understanding of information technology, cybersecurity, data privacy, information systems and related issues;

 

International/Global - Knowledge of global trends and considerations relating to supply chain management and multimodal transportation solutions; and

 

Legal/Regulatory/Government Affairs - Understanding of legal and regulatory implications, including ESG matters, and a strong grasp of the workings of government and public policy on a local, state and national level.

In addition to these specific categories, the Governance and Nomination Committee considers a number of other factors in considering director candidates, including board dynamics, an appropriate mix of skills and experience (including a balance between new and experienced directors), reputation of potential nominees, the nature and extent of a nominee’s other commitments, and expected contributions of the nominee to the Board and its committees.

 

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Below we identify the skills and qualifications that each director nominee brings to the Board. The fact that a particular skill or qualification is not designated does not mean the director nominee does not possess that particular attribute. Rather, the skills and qualifications noted below are those reviewed by the Governance and Nomination Committee and the Board in making nomination decisions. Each director nominee also contributes other important skills, expertise, experience, viewpoints, and personal attributes to our Board that are not reflected below. We believe the combination of the skills and qualifications shown below demonstrates how the Board is well-positioned to provide strategic oversight and guidance to management.

 

Director Skills and Qualifications

D. Congdon

Aaholm

J. Congdon, Jr.

Gabosch

Gantt

Hanley

Kasarda

Stallings

Stith

Suggs

Wray

Industry - Extensive knowledge and experience in the freight transportation and logistics industry

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

 

 

X

X

Executive Management - Senior level experience in operations, strategic planning, risk management and oversight, finance/accounting and economics, and/or treasury and securities markets

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Diversity – Self-identified diversity characteristics (including with respect to gender, race, ethnicity and national origin)

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

Human Resources and Safety - Knowledge of employee relations, safety and environmental issues

X

 

X

 

X

X

 

 

X

X

 

Shareholder Relations - Understanding of public company governance and institutional investor considerations

X

 

 

X

X

X

X

 

 

X

 

Customer Relations - Insight into marketing, sales and customer relationship management

X

 

X

 

X

 

 

X

X

X

X

Information Technology - Understanding of information technology, cybersecurity, data privacy, information systems and related issues

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

International/Global - Knowledge of global trends and considerations relating to supply chain management and multimodal transportation solutions

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

Legal/Regulatory/Government Affairs - Understanding of legal and regulatory implications, including ESG matters, and a strong grasp of the workings of government and public policy on a local, state and national level

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

X

X

 

 

 

In seeking and evaluating prospective director nominees, diversity in gender, race, ethnicity, culture, tenure of Board service, viewpoint, geography, and other qualities and attributes are important factors to consider in connection with the criteria outlined above and equal opportunity principles. The Governance and Nomination Committee is committed to actively seeking out highly qualified women and individuals from minority groups to include in the pool from which director nominees are chosen. We and the Governance and Nomination Committee believe that the current composition of the Board reflects a highly talented group of individuals best suited to perform oversight responsibilities for us and our shareholders at this time, and we will continue to consider diversity factors as we evaluate the composition

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of our Board. The following chart shows certain self-identified personal characteristics of our director nominees, in accordance with Nasdaq Listing Rule 5605(f).

Board Diversity Matrix (As of April 18, 2022)

Total Number of Directors

11

 

Female

Male

Part I: Gender Identity

Directors

2

9

Part II: Demographic Background

African American or Black

1

White

2

8

 

Director succession presents an opportunity for the Company to expand and replace key skills and experience and bring fresh perspectives to the boardroom. Since 2016, as part of our effort to identify, recruit and elect new directors whose qualifications would bring further strength to our Board, and as a result of the nomination process described above, we have added five new independent directors to the Board. The Governance and Nomination Committee periodically reviews the specific categories and factors considered in evaluating director candidates, and makes updates as needed to inform any future director searches.

Effect of Withheld Votes on an Uncontested Election

In an uncontested election of directors, any director nominee who receives a greater number of votes "withheld" from his or her election than votes "for" such election shall immediately offer his or her resignation for consideration by the Governance and Nomination Committee. This resignation is conditioned upon the Board's acceptance and thus shall not be effective unless and until the Board, after considering the recommendation of the Governance and Nomination Committee, accepts the director nominee's offer to resign. Nevertheless, if the director nominee does not wish to remain a director, he or she shall so state and shall tender a non-conditional resignation, which shall be effective as of the date thereof.

The Governance and Nomination Committee will promptly consider the director nominee's offer to resign and will recommend to the Board whether to accept or reject it. In making this recommendation, the Governance and Nomination Committee will consider all factors deemed relevant by its members, including, without limitation, the stated reasons, if any, why shareholders "withheld" votes for election from such director nominee, the length of service and qualifications of the director nominee, the director nominee's contributions to us, our Corporate Governance Guidelines, whether accepting the offered resignation would cause us to fail to meet any applicable SEC or Nasdaq requirements, and whether the director's resignation from the Board would be in the best interests of us and our shareholders.

The Board will act on the Governance and Nomination Committee's recommendation no later than 90 days following the date of the shareholders' meeting at which the election occurred. In considering the Governance and Nomination Committee's recommendation, the Board will consider the information and factors considered by the Governance and Nomination Committee and such additional information and factors as the Board deems relevant.

Any director nominee who offers his or her resignation for consideration pursuant to our Corporate Governance Guidelines will not participate in the Governance and Nomination Committee or Board deliberations regarding whether to accept the director nominee's offer to resign.

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Risk Management

The Board is responsible for the oversight of our policies, procedures and systems in place to manage our risk exposure. Our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer are responsible for the assessment and management of our risks and regularly report their findings to our Board directly or through their communications with our Audit Committee. Our Risk Management Department is responsible for identifying, assessing and monitoring risks inherent to our business and providing guidance to senior management and our Audit Committee regarding our enterprise risk management, insurance portfolio, business continuity programs, crisis management, claims management and governance, and record retention initiatives.

 

Our Compliance Department further enhances our ability to manage and assess our enterprise compliance, environmental programs, and risk mitigation controls. Our Compliance Department works closely with our Internal Audit and Risk Management Departments to develop strategies to identify, consolidate and maximize the effectiveness of our compliance initiatives across our multiple business functions, including safety, operations, finance, human resources, sales, marketing, pricing, purchasing, real estate, maintenance, legal and technology. Our Compliance Department also regularly interacts with various internal and external stakeholders regarding our ESG efforts and provides guidance to senior management and our Audit Committee regarding our compliance plans and progress.

Our Director of Internal Audit reports on risks that are identified during the internal audit process and our OD Technology Department reports on the risks associated with our information technology systems and data privacy initiatives. Our Internal Audit Department, as part of its audit plan that is approved by the Audit Committee, monitors cybersecurity audits as well as periodically engages third parties to perform cybersecurity assessments. We also use third parties to periodically benchmark and assess our cybersecurity and data privacy programs and to assess how any identified vulnerabilities in the industry might impact our Company as well as the sufficiency of our response. The results generated from these activities are reported to management and are used to develop action plans to address any identified opportunities for risk mitigation and overall improvement. The Audit Committee is apprised by management of the results of the third-party analysis, any related action plans and progress against those plans. Management, together with members of our OD Technology Department, brief the Board directly, or through their communications with the Audit Committee, on information security matters on at least a quarterly basis. After gathering and assessing information about our risk exposure, our Audit Committee reports the results of its review to the Board on a regular basis.

Other committees of the Board have risk oversight responsibility as well. The Governance and Nomination Committee is responsible for the oversight of risks associated with succession planning and corporate governance matters, including ESG matters and related shareholder and stakeholder communications, and the Compensation Committee is primarily responsible for the oversight of risks associated with employment agreements, compensation arrangements and human capital considerations, including the attraction and retention of qualified employees. The Chairs of both the Governance and Nomination Committee and the Compensation Committee report the results of their meetings and reviews to the Board on a regular basis. During 2021, the Board and its committees continued to devote significant time and attention to risks and related matters associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, including those related to protecting the health and safety of our employees while meeting the needs of our customers. The Board and its committees continued to provide active oversight of our response to the pandemic and received regular updates from management on the topic between meetings.

Our Lead Independent Director promotes effective communication and consideration of matters presenting significant risks to us through his role in coordinating with our Executive Chairman and our Chief Executive Officer on meeting agendas, advising committee chairs, chairing meetings of the independent directors and communicating between the independent directors, our Executive Chairman and our Chief Executive Officer.

 

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Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) Matters

 

Corporate responsibility is a critical priority for both the Board and our Company. As reflected in our Code of Business Conduct, we are committed to being an ethical and responsible company acting with integrity and respect for our environment, as well as with respect to each other, our customers, vendors, business partners, shareholders, and other stakeholders.

 

Our Board and our Governance and Nomination Committee regularly review and consider our diversity, equity and inclusion practices generally; environmental protection; and sustainability and corporate citizenship practices, and our Compliance Department regularly considers these and other ESG matters and reports on its findings and recommendations. Our Audit Committee also regularly considers the enterprise risks, initiatives and other programs associated with these protocols. Our Compensation Committee’s oversight of our human capital management initiatives includes, but is not limited to, periodic review and discussion with management on topics including: (i) talent acquisition, development, assessment and retention of employees; (ii) initiatives with regard to employee diversity, equity and inclusion; (iii) opportunities to further leverage technology in developing workforce analytics; and (iv) our unique OD Family culture and its connection to our overall strategy. On a day-to-day basis, ESG is collaboratively managed by our respective operational departments with oversight by our management-level ESG Steering Committee. Operational leaders are responsible for measuring and monitoring progress and for reviewing and applying stakeholder feedback and insights.

 

Highlights from our ESG strategies, programs and progress are outlined below. For more detail, please refer to our 2020 Environmental, Social, and Governance Report, available at https://ir.odfl.com/management-commitment. Our website and our 2020 Environmental, Social, and Governance Report are not incorporated by reference into, and do not form any part of, this proxy statement.

 

Taking Action for the Environment

 

We invest in new technologies and processes that drive responsible environmental stewardship. Operating a successful business provides us opportunities to do the right thing - in the way we treat one another and our communities. Now, more than ever, our industry understands the importance of incorporating sustainability measures into the way we operate. We are committed to continuing these investments.

 

As part of our ongoing investment in our fleet and service center network, we purchase new equipment, adopt new technologies, implement efficient process improvements, and make alterations to our facilities and fleet that improve our efficiency and reduce our environmental impact. We strive for continuous improvement through our capital investments and by assessing and managing our energy usage, waste levels, emissions, and carbon footprint.

 

We received the SmartWay® Excellence Award for the seventh consecutive year in 2021. The award recognizes us as an industry leader in exceptional freight performance, freight efficiency, and contributions to cleaner air throughout supply chains and reflects our significant efforts to improve miles per gallon performance, which improved by 15.5% from 2010 to 2020. Additionally, our Scope 1 and Scope 2 greenhouse gas emissions decreased by approximately 12% from 2018 to 2020.

 

On Being Social

 

People are the most valuable asset of our organization. Being professional, reliable, open, mindful, innovative, serving, ethical and supportive – “P.R.O.M.I.S.E.S.” – are the values and behaviors we aim to demonstrate in honor of one another.

 

Investing in our OD Family of Employees – We create opportunities to foster safety, excellence, healthy lifestyles, and career advancement for our team. We invest in our people, offering continuous education through OD Truck Driver Training, Supervisor Training, and Management Training programs.

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Our OD Truck Driver Training program empowers the career advancement of dock workers and other positions by offering hundreds of hours of driver training. Additionally, we offer an industry-competitive benefits package and various wellness programs designed to assist employees with establishing and living a healthy and balanced lifestyle.

 

Promoting Diversity, Equity and Inclusion – We are committed to recruiting, promoting, and retaining the best talent to support our mission of being the premier solutions provider in the transportation industry. This mission includes a commitment to source, hire, and develop candidates and employees from underrepresented groups and areas. In 2021, we partnered with the United Negro College Fund to offer trainee and internship programs, opportunities for professional development, and an introduction to careers in the LTL industry. We also host onsite and virtual job fairs at locations across the country, looking to recruit a diverse workforce from local high schools and colleges.

 

We are continually looking for ways to attract and further advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in our workplace. We value employee input and conduct Employee Engagement Surveys to learn how we can further improve and support everyone equally. Our efforts have earned us recognition as a great place to work, including being named as one of the 2020 and 2021 Top Companies for Women to Work for in Transportation and recognized on Forbes’ annual listing of America’s Best Large Employers for 2022.

 

Maintaining Health, Safety, and Reliability During Uncertain Times

 

COVID-19 Response – The COVID-19 public health crisis has required careful safety planning, training, and investment. Our OD Family of employees has followed applicable COVID-19 guidance issued by national, state and local officials. We continue to encourage everyone in the OD Family to follow safety measures as needed to keep themselves and their loved ones healthy and safe. It has been a team effort—one we all take seriously.

 

Workplace Injury Prevention Initiatives – Our behavior-based safety program, S.H.I.E.L.D. (Safety / Hazards / Injuries – Employees Leading the Defense), is focused on injury prevention initiatives. Our trained S.H.I.E.L.D. ambassadors, located in more than 100 service centers, are empowered to take prompt corrective action. We employ a team of regional safety managers across the country to help each service center follow proper safety practices. Technological advancements such as newer equipment for measuring cargo loads and improvements in forklifts with backup warning lights have helped enhance our safety programs. Our ASE-trained mechanics service our tractors at least each quarter, reducing the risk of breakdowns or the likelihood of equipment failure.

 

Driver Safety Training Program – We emphasize our safety culture through ongoing training and support for our OD Family of employees. The OD Truck Driver Training Program provides hundreds of training hours with seasoned drivers who serve as instructors. This training and our dedication to driver health and safety are key to our low driver turnover rate. Additional safety training includes Truckers Against Trafficking, hazardous materials training, and new driver training and evaluation.

 

Driver Working Conditions and Enhanced Truck Safety Technologies – We invest in technologies that can enhance safety, including lane departure warning and electronic roll stability control systems, collision mitigation technology, including audible driver alerts for drivers for certain speeds/distances, adaptive cruise control and brake assist, and forward-facing cameras. Additional driver safety and assistance support is provided by a country-wide team of approximately 60 safety employees who help service centers with safety practices and regional safety managers to provide driver assistance and support when needed.

 

Sharing and Supporting Community

 

We are deeply rooted in the communities we serve, and we are committed to investing resources to improve quality of life. We have expanded our business to new communities, creating quality jobs and contributing to the local tax base.

 

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We are proud to have the opportunity to give back and have raised millions of dollars in donations to non-profit organizations. With an aim to support family, health, education, veterans and military service members, and safety causes, we have partnered on initiatives with the American Red Cross, Salvation Army, United Service Organizations (“USO”), Toys for Tots, and United Way.

 

Audit Committee Pre-Approval Policies and Procedures

The Audit Committee has adopted a written policy that requires advance approval of all audit services, audit-related services, tax services and other services performed by our independent registered public accounting firm. The policy provides for pre-approval by the Audit Committee of specifically defined audit and permissible non-audit services. Unless the specific service has been pre-approved with respect to that year, the Audit Committee must approve the permitted service before the independent registered public accounting firm is engaged to perform it. The Audit Committee has delegated to the Chair of the Audit Committee authority to pre-approve permitted services under $50,000, provided that the Chair reports any decisions to all members of the Audit Committee at the earliest convenience. In the event the Chair is unavailable, the remaining members must unanimously approve any request for permitted services, not to exceed $50,000, and notify the Chair at the earliest convenience.

 

Policy for Accounting Complaints

The Audit Committee has established procedures for (i) the receipt, retention and processing of complaints related to accounting, internal accounting controls and auditing matters, and (ii) the confidential, anonymous submission by our employees of concerns regarding questionable accounting or auditing matters. The Company has contracted with a third party to provide a toll-free telephone number and Internet service that is staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week. This third party documents the complaint, assigns a reference number to the complaint for tracking purposes and forwards that information, through email, to the Chair of the Audit Committee, our Director - Internal Audit, and our Manager - Executive Administration. Either the Chair of the Audit Committee or our Director - Internal Audit, using whatever resources are required and working with the Corporate Compliance Department and Manager - Executive Administration as needed, initiates and/or manages the investigation of the complaint. Corrective action, if deemed necessary, is decided upon by the Chair of the Audit Committee and then implemented as needed. The identity of the individual submitting the complaint and the details of the complaint remain anonymous throughout this process.

 

Policy Against Hedging and Pledging of Company Securities

 

Our insider trading policy prohibits our directors, officers and employees from engaging in short sales of Company securities or purchasing financial instruments (including prepaid variable forward contracts, equity swaps, collars and exchange funds), or otherwise engaging in transactions that hedge or offset, or are designed to hedge or offset, any decrease in the market value of Company securities we have granted to such individuals as part of their compensation, or held, directly or indirectly, by them, regardless of the purpose for any such proposed transaction. Our insider trading policy also prohibits our directors, officers and employees from holding Company securities in a margin account or pledging Company securities as collateral for a loan, regardless of the purpose of any such proposed transaction.

Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation

The current members of the Compensation Committee are Mr. Suggs (Chair), Mr. Hanley, Ms. Stallings and Mr. Wray. None of the current members of the Compensation Committee has ever served as an officer or employee of our Company or had any relationship during the year ended December 31, 2021 that would be required to be disclosed pursuant to the SEC's Item 404 of Regulation S-K. No interlocking relationships exist between our directors, our executive officers or the Compensation Committee and the board of directors or compensation committee of any other company.

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Report of Audit Committee

The Audit Committee oversees our financial reporting, internal controls and audit functions on behalf of the Board and operates under a written charter, which is reviewed on an annual basis and was most recently revised on May 20, 2020. The Audit Committee is comprised solely of independent directors as defined by SEC rules and regulations and Nasdaq listing standards. Three of the four members of the Audit Committee, including the Chair, have been designated as “audit committee financial experts” as that term is defined by SEC rules and regulations. The Chair reports the Audit Committee's actions and deliberations to the Board at quarterly scheduled Board meetings.

During the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021, the Audit Committee fulfilled its duties and responsibilities as outlined in the charter. Among its actions, the Audit Committee:

 

reviewed and discussed, with management and our independent registered public accounting firm, EY, as appropriate, our quarterly earnings releases and the quarterly financial statements filed on Forms 10-Q with the SEC;

 

reviewed with management, the internal auditor and EY the audit scope and plan for the audit of the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021; and

 

met with the internal auditor and EY individually, outside the presence of management, to discuss, among other things, our financial disclosures, accounting policies and principles and internal controls.

In fulfilling its oversight responsibilities, the Audit Committee also reviewed and discussed the audited financial statements in the Annual Report on Form 10-K with management and EY. The Audit Committee also has reviewed and discussed with management and EY management’s assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting and EY’s evaluation of our internal control over financial reporting.

The Audit Committee has discussed with EY the matters required to be discussed by the applicable requirements of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (the “PCAOB”) and the SEC. In addition, the Audit Committee has received the written disclosures and the letter from EY required by applicable requirements of the PCAOB regarding EY's communications with the Audit Committee concerning independence, and has discussed with EY that firm's independence.

Based on the review and discussions referred to above, the Audit Committee recommended to the Board that the audited financial statements be included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2021 for filing with the SEC.

The Audit Committee,


D. Michael Wray, Chair

Sherry A. Aaholm

Bradley R. Gabosch

Patrick D. Hanley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Compensation Discussion and Analysis

Executive Summary of Compensation Program

 

Company Performance and Business Highlights

 

The Company delivered exceptional financial performance in 2021, driven by the consistent and disciplined execution of our long-term strategic plan. While the COVID-19 pandemic created considerable economic uncertainty in 2020, we saw a significant increase in the demand for freight with the improvement in the economy throughout 2021. We were able to create value for our customers by delivering best-in-class service and offering capacity at a time when it was generally limited in our industry. Furthermore, strong GDP growth coupled with the rebound of many industries helped the Company achieve new Company records with revenue of $5.3 billion, net income of $1.0 billion and an operating ratio of 73.5%. Compared with 2020, these results reflected improvements of approximately 31% for revenue, 54% for net income, and 390 basis points for operating ratio.

We believe our industry-leading results demonstrate continued execution of our long-term growth strategy of delivering superior service at a fair price while also continuing to invest in capacity to achieve our long-term market share goals. The discipline instilled by our executive officers to remain committed to these long-term philosophies across our organization has contributed to compound annualized total shareholder returns, including cumulative dividends, of 63.6%, 44.5% and 35.0% over the three-year, five-year and ten-year periods ended December 31, 2021, respectively, significantly outperforming industry peers and the broader market. During 2021, we repurchased $599.0 million of common stock and returned $92.4 million to shareholders through cash dividends. We have increased our per share dividend by an average of 31.6% annually since inception of this program in 2017. We believe these results demonstrate the alignment of our executive compensation program with Company performance and the long-term interests of our shareholders.

Highlights of Compensation Program Changes for 2022

In October 2021, the Compensation Committee reviewed the compensation of the Company’s named executive officers and approved certain material changes, effective January 1, 2022, to the compensation arrangements for each of: (i) David S. Congdon, the Company’s Executive Chairman of the Board; and (ii) Greg C. Gantt, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Company and a member of the Board.

 

With respect to Mr. Congdon, the Compensation Committee approved the following changes that were further modifications to the previously disclosed multi-year approach of reduced pay levels across all pay components as part of the Company’s long-term succession planning: (i) his base salary was reduced by 24% from its 2021 level; (ii) his participation factor in the PIP used to determine his short-term incentive compensation was reduced by 46% from its 2021 level; and (iii) he will no longer receive stock-based compensation under the Old Dominion Freight Line, Inc. 2016 Stock Incentive Plan (the “2016 Plan”).

 

 

With respect to Mr. Gantt, the Compensation Committee approved an increase in his base salary to $920,000, to better align his base salary with competitive market levels for chief executive officers in our peer group.

These changes were made after discussion with Pearl Meyer and our senior management team, as well as consideration of Pearl Meyer’s industry and market analysis, recommendations and findings with respect to our executive compensation program, and consideration of shareholder outreach feedback. We believe these compensation program changes further enhance the pay-for-performance focus of our executive compensation program, which underwent a significant redesign beginning in 2019 in response to shareholder feedback, and continue to strengthen the alignment of our executive compensation program with the long-term interests of our shareholders.

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We seek to pay our executive officers fairly and competitively and to link pay with performance. As in 2020, the main elements of our compensation program are base salary, performance-based cash incentive awards under our PIP, and performance-based stock incentive compensation in the form of RSAs tied to our operating ratio results and PBRSUs tied to Company profitability.

Compensation Objectives

Our guiding principles in the development of our executive compensation philosophy have been to align executive compensation with both our business objectives and the interests of our shareholders. We have attempted to balance the principal elements of our compensation program (base salary, short-term performance-based incentives and long-term performance-based incentives) to motivate our executives to achieve our short-term financial objectives as well as our long-term objectives of increasing our market share and shareholder value. We believe a significant portion of executive compensation should be based upon performance, and we have designed our elements of compensation accordingly. These guiding compensation principles have continued to effectively motivate our executive management team and have enabled us to deliver superior short- and long-term performance relative to our peers.

Shareholder Outreach, Feedback and Compensation Committee Response

We are committed to ensuring our executive compensation program reinforces key business and strategic objectives and aligns pay with performance and long-term value creation. We believe our executive compensation program has been successful in achieving these objectives by placing a significant emphasis on variable, performance-based incentives and focusing our executive officers and other key employees on continuous operational excellence in support of long-term shareholder value creation. The program’s success is evidenced by our strong absolute and relative financial performance and long-term total shareholder returns. Our Board and Compensation Committee value the opinions of our shareholders and, to the extent there is any significant vote against the compensation of our named executive officers as disclosed in the proxy statement, we will carefully consider our shareholders’ concerns and the Compensation Committee will evaluate whether any actions are necessary to address those concerns. At our 2021 Annual Meeting, approximately 94% of the votes cast on the advisory vote to approve the compensation of our named executive officers were in favor of the proposal. We believe this strong support for the executive compensation program from our shareholders was a result of our continued commitment to pay-for-performance, the significant changes to our executive compensation program that we implemented beginning in 2019 to further reinforce our compensation program objectives, our continued shareholder outreach, and careful consideration of shareholder feedback regarding our executive compensation program.

Continued Pay-for-Performance Alignment

We believe our executive compensation program continues to strike the appropriate balance between driving the Company’s short-term goals while also providing a strong emphasis on performance-based equity awards in support of long-term shareholder value creation. In reviewing and designing our executive compensation program, we focused on connecting our compensation objectives to our current business strategy and ensuring our executive officers are compensated based on results that support this strategy. We believe our current executive compensation program establishes the appropriate balance and mix of executive pay between base salaries, short-term incentives, and long-term incentives. We do not believe the elements of our executive compensation program encourage excessive risk-taking, and we regularly review our program with our Compensation Committee and our Board to ensure it is operating in accordance with our objectives.

Our executive compensation program includes a significant portion of performance-based compensation, which we believe has been critical in supporting the long-term growth of our Company and increased shareholder value. The table below provides a summary of the percentage of total direct

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compensation for our named executive officers in the aggregate that is directly based on our corporate performance:

 

2021

2020

2019

Non-performance-based Pay

Base Salary

9%

11%

11%

Performance-based Pay

Performance-based Cash Incentive

71%

67%

65%

Performance-based Stock Incentive*

20%

22%

24%

Total Direct Compensation

100%

100%

100%

 

*    The performance-based stock incentive component of 2021, 2020 and 2019 total direct compensation includes the grant date fair value of RSAs granted in each year and target PBRSUs granted in each year. The PBRSUs granted in 2021 were earned at the maximum level, the PBRSUs granted in 2020 were earned at the target level and the PBRSUs granted in 2019 were not earned and were subsequently forfeited.  

 

            

            

            

 

Our executive compensation program continues to tie a significant portion of cash compensation directly to corporate performance primarily through the PIP. We made changes to our executive compensation program in 2019 to (i) include a new type of long-term equity incentive award, in the form of PBRSUs tied to prospective Company profitability, and (ii) reduce the PIP participation factor for many of our executive officers, which has resulted in a higher percentage of performance-based equity compensation for our executives. As described below, the PIP provides for monthly bonuses of a specified percentage of our monthly pre-tax income to the PIP participants, subject to (i) a minimum profitability threshold requirement and (ii) limits on the total amount that may be paid to an executive officer under the PIP, to the lesser of (a) 10x such executive officer’s base salary, and (b) 1.5% of the Company’s pre-tax income, as defined in the PIP. We believe the PIP has been instrumental in motivating our named executive officers and other participating officers to consistently achieve and sustain superior profitability in our industry.

We believe long-term incentives are also necessary to align pay with performance, reward loyalty, enhance retention, and create shareholder value. All equity grants issued to named executive officers and other officers in 2021 were made under the 2016 Plan, our primary plan for equity-based incentive compensation. Equity grant levels are tied to performance requirements, with any earned shares subject to continued service vesting provisions to further enhance retention. In addition to RSA grants tied to operating ratio results, beginning in 2019, each executive officer, including each named executive officer, also became eligible to receive a PBRSU award under the 2016 Plan based on the achievement of forward-looking performance objectives over a one-year performance period that will further strengthen the alignment of executive officer compensation with long-term shareholder interests. Other elements of our executive compensation program include employee deferrals of short-term cash compensation into our Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Plan and contributions to our 401(k) retirement plan, which are described in more detail below.

The principal factors in the Compensation Committee’s executive compensation decisions for 2021 were (i) our financial performance, (ii) the relationship of executive compensation to the Company’s pre-tax income, (iii) the amount of compensation that is performance-based, (iv) the review and analysis conducted by its independent compensation consultant, (v) our strong support received for “say-on-pay” voting results, and (vi) shareholder feedback.

The Company ended 2021 with exceptional financial results, due in large part to our ability to focus on superior customer service, the quality of our revenue and disciplined cost management. Our success with these ongoing initiatives, while also investing $566.1 million in capital expenditures in 2021 to increase our capacity for future growth, provides us with the financial and operational strength to maximize our opportunities in 2022. Based on our industry-leading profitable financial performance in

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2021, PIP payments increased accordingly, prior to accounting for PIP limits for Mr. Congdon and Mr. Gantt, as a result of our higher pre-tax income. In addition, we achieved an industry-leading operating ratio of 73.5% in 2021, which was a continued improvement from the Company operating ratio of 77.4% in 2020. As a result, Messrs. Gantt, Satterfield, Freeman and Plemmons earned performance-based RSAs equal to 100% of base salary, the maximum award opportunity. These RSAs were granted in February 2022 and will vest in three equal annual increments beginning on the first anniversary of the grant date. Since the grants were made in February 2022, they will be included in tabular disclosures in our proxy statement for fiscal 2022, based on current SEC reporting requirements. Mr. Congdon did not receive an RSA grant as he no longer receives stock based-compensation under the 2016 Plan. We delivered exceptional financial results in 2021 compared to 2020, including Company records for annual revenue and profitability, an 83.6% increase in the price of our common stock and a 33% increase in our dividends per share of common stock. The Company achieved 54% pre-tax income growth in 2021, which resulted in the 2021 PBRSU grants being earned at the maximum level.

 

Objectives of Our Executive Compensation Program

Our executive compensation program is designed to achieve the following objectives, consistent with the principles and philosophy outlined above:

 

provide meaningful and competitive compensation opportunities with a primary emphasis on variable incentives to encourage superior corporate performance and long-term shareholder value creation;

 

motivate and reward our executives to increase short- and long-term Company earnings; and

 

promote and foster an environment of cooperation and “OD family spirit.”

We also believe it is critical that our executive compensation program is structured to:

 

attract talented, knowledgeable and experienced executives, who are critical to our success in the highly competitive transportation industry;

 

retain our executives so they can add further value in current and future roles by providing long-term incentives that reward performance, loyalty, retention and growth in shareholder value; and

 

provide a reasonable level of compensation protection to our executive officers to offset some of the risks of a change in ownership.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Below we highlight key compensation practices that we have implemented in our executive compensation program to promote the interests of shareholders and ensure responsible compensation and governance practices.

WHAT WE DO

Pay-for-performance

Limits on maximum incentive payouts

Significant portion of compensation for named executive officers is at-risk

Annual advisory vote on executive compensation

Independent compensation consultant

Significant stock ownership guidelines for executives (who are also subject to stock retention requirements) and directors

Robust clawback policy

Engage in outreach and maintain a dialogue with shareholders relating to the Company’s governance and compensation practices

WHAT WE DO NOT DO

No hedging or pledging of Company stock

No single-trigger cash severance benefits upon a change in control

No guaranteed salary increases or bonuses

No tax gross-up payments for executives

No liberal share recycling under the 2016 Plan

No dividends paid on unearned or unvested performance-based restricted stock units

 

In 2021, we believe the combination of our continued focus on revenue quality and the cost control discipline instilled across our organization by our senior executive management team enabled us to further improve our operating ratio. We achieved exceptional financial results in a dynamic macroeconomic environment by aggressively recruiting quality employees and maintaining our commitment to providing superior customer service to address increasing business levels throughout 2021. Our success would not have been possible without our commitment to a long-term strategic plan that is centered on the delivery of superior service at a fair price. We continue to evaluate our service offerings and are dedicated to ensuring that our service remains best-in-class, and we were very proud to win the Mastio Quality Award for the twelfth consecutive year. The Mastio Quality Award recognizes the top national LTL company across various customer service categories, based on Mastio’s annual survey conducted with freight customers in numerous industries.

Our commitment to customer service and consistent execution of our strategic plan by our team, which includes approximately 25,000 employees, has resulted in the long-term consistent improvement in our financial results. As a result of this improvement, we delivered total shareholder returns for the one-, three-, and five-year periods ended December 31, 2021 that significantly outperformed the companies in our peer group, ranking approximately at or above the 75th percentile over each period. The consistent improvement in both short- and long-term shareholder value creation reinforced the determination by our Compensation Committee and Board that our executive compensation program is achieving its desired objectives.

Role of Compensation Committee, Independent Directors and Management

The Compensation Committee is comprised entirely of independent directors, and this committee is charged with recommending to our Board the compensation of our Chief Executive Officer and determining the compensation paid to our other executive officers. Additionally, the Compensation

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Committee makes recommendations to the Board regarding the adoption of, and changes to, our executive compensation plans.

Mr. Gantt, our President and Chief Executive Officer, has a significant role in the compensation-setting process, including (i) providing recommendations to the Compensation Committee on business performance targets and objectives, and (ii) evaluating individual performance. From time to time, Mr. Gantt and Mr. Congdon, our Executive Chairman, also provide recommendations to the Compensation Committee regarding salary and equity or non-equity based award considerations.

Mr. Congdon and Mr. Gantt do not participate in any Compensation Committee decisions regarding their individual performance, salary level, non-equity incentive plan compensation or other compensation that may be granted to them.

The Compensation Committee has the authority to hire outside advisers, such as compensation consultants, to render guidance and assistance when the Compensation Committee deems it appropriate and advisable. The Compensation Committee, at its discretion, determines both the frequency that outside consultants are engaged and the scope of work these consultants perform. Prior to selecting or receiving advice from a compensation consultant or other adviser, the Compensation Committee assesses the independence of such adviser and thereafter conducts an annual assessment of any potential conflicts of interest raised by the work of such adviser.

Role of Compensation Consultant

Since 2013, the Compensation Committee has periodically engaged Pearl Meyer to assist it with its review and analysis of our executive and non-employee director compensation programs. The Compensation Committee initially selected and has continued to engage Pearl Meyer based primarily on its skill sets, strengths, professionals, industry knowledge and resources.

During the second quarter of 2021, the Compensation Committee engaged Pearl Meyer to conduct a review and analysis of the Company’s executive compensation program for its executive officer and non-employee director compensation programs. With respect to the executive compensation program, Pearl Meyer conducted a market pay review for each executive officer position, business performance analysis, total shareholder return analysis and pay and performance alignment review. In conducting its analysis, Pearl Meyer compared and summarized compensation data from the same fifteen peer group companies used during Pearl Meyer’s review of our executive compensation program performed in 2020 and listed below. At the time the study was conducted, the Company was positioned at or above the 75th percentile for profitability, enterprise value and long-term shareholder returns, and between the 25th and 50th percentiles for revenue as compared with the industry peer group. In addition, Pearl Meyer collected and summarized pay data from multiple and reputable executive compensation surveys to supplement the peer group data when officer position matches were either unavailable or were limited in number.

2021 Peer Group

AMERCO

C.H. Robinson Worldwide, Inc.

CSX Corporation

Expeditors International of Washington, Inc.

Hub Group, Inc.

 

J.B. Hunt Transport Services, Inc.

 

Kansas City Southern

 

Knight-Swift Transportation Holdings Inc.

 

Landstar System, Inc.

 

Norfolk Southern Corporation

 

Ryder System, Inc.

 

Saia, Inc.

 

Schneider National, Inc.

 

Werner Enterprises, Inc.

 

XPO Logistics, Inc.

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Following confirmation of the peer group composition by the Compensation Committee, Pearl Meyer conducted a review and analysis of our executive compensation program, which would be considered by the Compensation Committee and the Board when making 2022 compensation decisions. With respect to our executive compensation program, Pearl Meyer was requested to review the competitiveness of the program and analyze recent business results in order to evaluate the strength of the relationship between executive officer pay and overall Company performance. Pearl Meyer’s analysis of our executive compensation program: (i) included each of our executive officer positions; (ii) focused on position level pay data (with respect to base salary, short-term incentives, total cash compensation, long-term incentives and total direct compensation (sum of base salary, short-term incentives and long-term incentives)); and (iii) highlighted comparisons to market based on publicly-available proxy statements and further supplemented by published survey data.

Based on its review and analysis, Pearl Meyer determined, among other things, that: (i) our aggregate total direct compensation levels for the executive officer group were above the 75th percentile of the market; (ii) our average overall performance was near or above the 75th percentile results for the fifteen peer group companies identified above based on a variety of financial and shareholder metrics over multiple time periods; (iii) our executive pay structure provided a much higher variable compensation mix as compared to market with 86% or more of executive compensation at risk; (iv) our base salaries were between 25th percentile and 50th percentile market values in the aggregate; and (v) our long-term incentive compensation was also between the 25th percentile and 50th percentile market values in the aggregate. The Compensation Committee considered Pearl Meyer’s findings and analysis when it assessed our executive compensation program for 2022 and approved: (i) modest base salary increases for Messrs. Satterfield, Freeman and Plemmons; (ii) a base salary increase to $920,000 for Mr. Gantt to address market competitiveness; and (iii) further modifications to the previously disclosed multi-year approach of reduced pay levels for Mr. Congdon across all pay components as part of the Company’s long-term succession planning.

Although peer data is utilized in Pearl Meyer’s analysis, and the Compensation Committee reviews and considers such data in making compensation decisions, we do not benchmark compensation to any particular peer group percentile for any of our named executive officers. Given our strong financial performance, the majority of total compensation for our named executive officers over the past several years has been delivered through the PIP, which rewards our executives for driving superior financial performance. The Compensation Committee periodically reviews all aspects of our compensation program, including the pay mix for officers, to ensure alignment with desired objectives. After the Compensation Committee reviewed and considered the results of Pearl Meyer’s analysis conducted in 2021, our 2021 “say-on-pay” voting results and shareholder outreach feedback, in October 2021, the Compensation Committee approved various changes to our executive compensation program for certain named executive officers effective January 2022, as discussed above.

In connection with its engagement of Pearl Meyer, the Compensation Committee conducted a conflict of interest assessment and determined that Pearl Meyer was independent and that its engagement did not present any conflicts of interest. During fiscal 2021, Pearl Meyer only worked for the Compensation Committee and performed no additional services for the Company or any of the named executive officers. The Compensation Committee pre-approved all work performed by Pearl Meyer.

During fiscal 2021, neither the Compensation Committee nor Company management used the services of any other compensation consultant other than Pearl Meyer.

Elements of Compensation

Set forth below is each of the components of our executive compensation program and the decisions the Compensation Committee made in connection with 2021 and, where appropriate, 2022 compensation.

 

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Annual Base Salary

Base salaries for our executive officer group are designed to reflect job responsibilities and incumbent qualifications and to provide competitive, fixed pay to balance performance-based risks. We have historically increased the base salaries of our named executive officers annually for an inflationary factor and, in some instances, an incremental adjustment attributable to market factors or a change in responsibilities. Base salaries for our named executive officer group are generally intended to approximate 50th percentile market values for similar roles within comparably-sized organizations. The Compensation Committee may also approve additional salary increases for certain officers, including certain named executive officers, when job performance, promotions and increased job responsibilities and/or other factors warrant.

The table below reflects the annual base salaries for our named executive officers that have been approved by the Compensation Committee for 2022, and annual base salaries for 2021 and 2020:

Named Executive Officer

2022 Base Salary (1)

($)

2021 Base Salary (1)

($)

2020 Base Salary (1)

($)

David S. Congdon

    488,735 (2)

639,115

751,900

Greg C. Gantt

    920,000 (3)

774,457

751,900

Adam N. Satterfield

510,585

493,319

478,950

Kevin M. Freeman

603,917

583,495

566,500

Gregory B. Plemmons

495,411

    478,687 (4)

(4)

 

 

(1)

The base salaries reported in this table and corresponding amounts reflected in the Summary Compensation Table may differ due to the timing of effective dates for base salary changes.

 

 

(2)

Effective January 1, 2022, Mr. Congdon’s base salary was reduced by 24% from its 2021 level as part of further modifications to the previously disclosed multi-year approach of reduced pay levels across all pay components as part of the Company’s long-term succession planning.  

 

 

(3)

Effective January 1, 2022, Mr. Gantt’s base salary was increased to $920,000 to address market competitiveness.

 

 

(4)

Mr. Plemmons was not a named executive officer for the year ended December 31, 2020. During the year ended December 31, 2021, his base salary was increased by: (i) the annual salary inflationary adjustment provided to officers generally, as described above, and (ii) an additional 5% to acknowledge his accomplishments and ongoing contributions to the Company.

Non-equity Incentive Plan

The Compensation Committee has determined that a significant portion of compensation provided to our named executive officers should be performance-based. Accordingly, during 2021, our named executive officers participated with certain other employees in our PIP, which is an incentive cash bonus plan designed to incentivize participants to achieve the Company’s strategic and financial goals for the fiscal year, using a formulaic calculation. The PIP is administered by the Compensation Committee. Participants were selected by the Compensation Committee, with input by senior management, to receive a monthly cash incentive payment based upon a fixed percentage, or participation factor, of our pre-tax income if our pre-tax income exceeds 2% of revenue for that month. The Compensation Committee approved the participation factors for our named executive officers and other key participants and monitored the compensation derived from the PIP.

 

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The formula applied for each participant in the PIP is shown below:

Monthly Income Before Income Taxes x Participation Factor = Monthly Payout

The PIP has been very effective in focusing our executive officers and other participants on continuous operational excellence and aligning pay with performance. Compensation earned under the PIP is “at risk” and performance-based, and will vary over time based on our profitability. Generally, any decrease in pre-tax income directly – and negatively – impacts the amount of PIP compensation paid to our named executive officers.

For illustration purposes, the following table reflects minimum, threshold and maximum PIP payouts that could be earned by each named executive officer based on his individual PIP participation factor. Pre-tax income must exceed 2% of revenue for the threshold amount to be earned. The threshold amounts below are calculated using a pre-tax income amount of $105.1 million, which is 2% of our 2021 revenue. We used our 2021 revenue of $5.3 billion as the base revenue for this illustration, as we have not provided revenue guidance for any future periods.

 

Pro Forma 2022 PIP Payout

Named Executive Officer

Minimum

$

 

Threshold (1)

$

 

Maximum (2)

$

 

 

David S. Congdon

 

 

 

289,025

 

 

4,887,350

 

 

Greg C. Gantt

 

 

 

630,600

 

 

9,200,000

 

 

Adam N. Satterfield

 

 

 

262,750

 

 

5,105,850

 

 

Kevin M. Freeman

 

 

 

315,300

 

 

6,039,170

 

 

Gregory B. Plemmons

 

 

 

189,180

 

 

4,954,110

 

 

(1)

Illustrative amount determined by multiplying the named executive officer’s PIP participation factor by $105.1 million of pre-tax income.

(2) Awards are limited to 10x the named executive officer’s base salary.

The following table shows the 2022 and 2021 PIP participation factors as well as the payouts earned by each of our named executive officers for each of 2021 and 2020:

 

Named Executive Officer

2022 PIP

Participation

Factor (%)

2021 PIP

Participation

Factor (%)

2021 PIP

Payout ($)

2020 PIP

Payout ($)

 

David S. Congdon (1)

 

0.275

0.51

6,391,150

5,526,958

 

Greg C. Gantt

 

0.60

0.60

7,744,570

5,526,958

 

Adam N. Satterfield

 

0.25

0.25

3,471,056

2,026,551

 

Kevin M. Freeman

 

0.30

0.30

4,165,267

2,763,479

 

Gregory B. Plemmons

 

0.18

0.18

2,499,160

(2)

 

(1)

Effective January 1, 2022, Mr. Congdon’s PIP participation factor was decreased from 0.51% to 0.275% as a further modification to the previously disclosed multi-year approach of reduced pay levels across all pay components as part of the Company’s long-term succession planning.  

(2)

Mr. Plemmons was not a named executive officer for the year ended December 31, 2020.

The cash incentive provided by the PIP is determined on a monthly basis and paid to participants, subject to (i) our pre-tax income exceeding 2% of revenue for that month, and (ii) limits on the total amount that may be paid to an executive officer under the PIP, to the lesser of (a) 10x such executive officer’s base salary, and (b) 1.5% of the Company’s pre-tax income, as defined in the PIP. Each of these criteria were satisfied for each participant for each month in 2021, and as a result, our named executive

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officers received cash compensation from the PIP each month based upon their respective participation factor. In keeping with our philosophy of pay-for-performance, PIP payouts to our officers, including our named executive officers, in 2021 were directly aligned with our financial performance. In 2021, our annual pre-tax income increased to approximately $1.39 billion, representing a 54% year-over-year increase as compared to 2020 results. PIP payouts for Mr. Congdon and Mr. Gantt reflect reductions of approximately 10% and 7%, respectively, due to the PIP limit of 10x each executive’s base salary.

The Compensation Committee recognizes that the PIP can produce higher-than-market cash compensation during periods of high profitability, including periods when our period-over-period performance may have declined. However, the PIP can also produce lower-than-market cash compensation during periods of low profitability, including periods when our period-over-period performance has improved and/or outperformed peers.

The Compensation Committee has considered whether our employee compensation policies and practices, including our PIP, create inadvertent incentives for executive management and other participants to make decisions that are reasonably likely to have a material adverse effect on us, and believes they do not. The Compensation Committee believes the overarching characteristic of the PIP is its ability to create a highly motivated and aligned management team that is focused on consistently executing our operating plan, improving our performance, and creating long-term value for our shareholders. The compounded annualized increase in our revenue and pre-tax income over the past ten years was 10.7% and 20.2%, respectively. The compounded annualized total shareholder return, including cumulative dividends, over the past three, five and ten years was 63.6%, 44.5% and 35.0%, respectively.

2016 Stock Incentive Plan

In 2016, as part of our ongoing commitment to review and assess the appropriateness and competitiveness of our executive compensation program, we determined to shift our equity compensation policy to allow for stock-settled awards. We believe stock-settled awards serve as a stronger incentive and retention tool and more closely align participant and shareholder interests. To further this objective, the Compensation Committee and the Board adopted the 2016 Plan, which was subsequently approved by our shareholders at our 2016 Annual Meeting. Since 2016, the Compensation Committee has annually granted performance-based RSAs for shares of our common stock under the 2016 Plan to our named executive officers, as well as other officers, and service-based RSAs to members of the Board. Since 2019, the Compensation Committee also has granted PBRSUs to our executive officers, which are settled in shares of our common stock under the 2016 Plan if the requisite prospective performance objective and service requirements are achieved.

The 2016 Plan permits the grant of a broad array of equity award types, including RSAs, PBRSUs and other restricted stock units, stock options and stock appreciation rights. The 2016 Plan authorizes the issuance of up to 3,000,000 shares of our common stock.

Performance-Based Restricted Stock Awards

RSA grants under the 2016 Plan are based on attainment of Company performance objectives, with no awards provided when results fall below a minimum performance threshold. The Compensation Committee generally determines the RSA amounts based on a percentage of annual base salary that is determined by our operating ratio for the previous fiscal year. Operating ratio is a profitability measure used within the transportation industry and is calculated by dividing total operating expenses by revenue. The Compensation Committee may approve an RSA under the 2016 Plan in an amount ranging from 0% up to 100% of an officer’s base salary for achieving a progressively lower operating ratio. No grants are made for an operating ratio greater than 95%. The Compensation Committee believes the underlying

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performance hurdles are challenging and would generally require us to perform at or above industry norms to earn grants in the upper half of the award opportunity range.

If the minimum performance threshold is met, any earned awards are provided in the form of RSAs that vest in equal annual installments over a period of three years, subject to continued employment, to further enhance executive retention and incentive. Vesting may also occur on the earliest of: (i) the date of a change in control of our ownership, which includes a “double trigger” and assumes the RSAs are not substituted, assumed, or continued; or (ii) the date the participant’s employment is terminated without cause by the Company or by the participant for good reason within six months before or one year after the effective date of the change of control; or (iii) the date the participant’s employment is terminated as a result of death or disability.

The RSA awards granted in 2021, 2020 and 2019 were determined by our operating ratio results for the preceding fiscal year. Our operating ratio was 77.4%, 80.1%, and 79.8% for the years 2020, 2019, and 2018, respectively. As a result, the Compensation Committee approved RSAs that were granted under the 2016 Plan equal to 100% of each named executive officer’s annual base salary in February 2019 (reported in the Summary Compensation Table as compensation for fiscal year 2019), equal to 90% of each named executive officer’s annual base salary in February 2020 (reported as compensation for fiscal year 2020), and equal to 100% of annual base salary for each of Messrs. Gantt, Satterfield, Freeman and Plemmons in February 2021 (reported as compensation for fiscal year 2021). With respect to Mr. Congdon, the Compensation Committee approved an RSA grant equal to 85% of his annual base salary in February 2021 (reported as compensation for fiscal year 2021), consistent with the previously disclosed multi-year approach of reduced pay levels across all pay components as part of the Company’s long-term succession planning. The number of shares awarded for each individual was calculated by dividing the cash value of the award by the 50-day moving average closing price of our common stock for the period ending on the trading day immediately preceding each grant date. The fair value at each grant date is calculated by multiplying the number of shares granted for each individual by the closing price of our common stock on such grant date. See "Executive Compensation - 2021 Grants of Plan-Based Awards" for more information about the 2021 RSA grants.

 

 

Value of Earned Restricted Stock Award (RSA) At Grant ($)

Named Executive Officer

2021

2020

2019

David S. Congdon

559,420

768,372

811,127

Greg C. Gantt

797,417

768,372

811,127

Adam N. Satterfield

507,826

489,356

516,751

Kevin M. Freeman

600,820

578,843

611,207

Gregory B. Plemmons

469,754

(1)

(1)

 

 

(1)

Mr. Plemmons was not a named executive officer for the years ended December 31, 2020 or December 31, 2019.

The amounts of our fiscal 2022 RSA grants were determined by our 2021 operating ratio of 73.5%, which improved by 390 basis points and once again led the industry. As a result, each of Messrs. Gantt, Satterfield, Freeman, and Plemmons earned RSA grants equal to 100% of base salary, which was consistent with the RSA grant amount earned in the prior year. Since the grants were made in February 2022, they will be included in tabular disclosures in our proxy statement for fiscal 2022, based on current SEC reporting requirements. Mr. Congdon did not receive an RSA grant as he no longer receives stock based-compensation under the 2016 Plan.

Performance-Based Restricted Stock Units

We believe that grants of PBRSUs under the 2016 Plan to each of our executive officers are a key long-term incentive component of our executive compensation program and further enhance our pay-for-performance philosophy. PBRSUs are directly linked to the Company’s prospective performance, with

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annual pre-tax income growth as the sole performance metric. We believe growth in pre-tax income is a key contributor to the long-term improvement in the price of our common stock.

The amount of the PBRSUs eligible to be earned may range from 0% to 200% of each officer’s base salary for the year in which the grant is made. The earning of the PBRSUs is tied to the achievement of pre-tax income growth performance goals established by the Compensation Committee over a one-year performance period. No awards are earned for below-threshold performance. One-third of any earned PBRSUs are paid out following the end of the performance period, and an additional one-third of the PBRSUs are paid out on each anniversary thereafter, subject to continued employment by the named executive officer for further retention and incentive purposes. Vesting may also occur on the earliest of: (i) the date of a change in control of our ownership, which includes a “double trigger” and assumes the PBRSUs are not substituted, assumed, or continued; or (ii) the date the participant’s employment is terminated without cause by the Company or by the participant for good reason within six months before or one year after the effective date of the change of control; or (iii) the date the participant’s employment is terminated as a result of death or disability.

Each named executive officer received a PBRSU grant in February 2021. Named executive officers with the title of Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, or Chief Operating Officer received a target PBRSU award of 100% of base salary, and named executive officers with the title of Senior Vice President received a target PBRSU award of 50% of base salary. As such, the target PBRSU award for Messrs. Gantt, Satterfield and Freeman was equal to 100% of each officer’s base salary, and the target PBRSU award for Mr. Plemmons was equal to 50% of his base salary. The target PBRSU award for Mr. Congdon was equal to 85% of his base salary consistent with the previously disclosed multi-year approach of reduced pay levels across all pay components as part of the Company’s long-term succession planning. In 2021, our annual pre-tax income growth of 54% resulted in each named executive officer earning a PBRSU award at the maximum level, which was equivalent to 200% of each named executive officer’s target PBRSU award.

The table below sets forth the target PBRSU award for each named executive officer, expressed as a percentage of the named executive officer’s base salary for the 2021 performance period, the target number of PBRSUs, and the actual number of PBRSUs earned in 2021:

Named Executive Officer

Target 2021 PBRSU Awards As Percentage of Base Salary

 

Target 2021 PBRSUs (#)

 

2021 PBRSUs Earned (#)

David S. Congdon

85%

2,689

5,378

Greg C. Gantt

100%

3,833

7,667

Adam N. Satterfield

100%

2,441

4,883

Kevin M. Freeman

100%

2,888

5,776

Gregory B. Plemmons

50%

1,129

2,258

 

In January 2022, the Compensation Committee again selected pre-tax income growth as the performance metric and established year-over-year pre-tax income growth performance goals in connection with the grant of 2022 PBRSUs to our executive officers. The Compensation Committee believes that continuing to tie PBRSUs to pre-tax income growth goals that are aligned with our fiscal 2022 financial plan will appropriately incentivize our executive officers to achieve the Company’s strategic and financial goals. The Compensation Committee also determined that the target number of shares of common stock subject to the PBRSU award will be equal to a specified percentage of each named executive officer’s 2022 base salary amount. The actual number of PBRSUs earned can range from 0% to 200% of target levels based on Company performance. We have not disclosed the specific goals for pre-tax income for fiscal 2022, as they are highly confidential and not reported publicly. Disclosing the specific goals would provide competitors and third parties with insights into our internal planning processes, which might allow our competitors to predict certain business strategies and cause us competitive harm. The Compensation Committee has set the fiscal 2022 pre-tax income performance

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target at a level that it believes to be challenging, but attainable. The shares underlying the PBRSUs awarded for fiscal 2022 are eligible to be earned only if we achieve a minimum threshold of growth in pre-tax income for fiscal 2022 as compared to 2021.

The table below sets forth the target PBRSU award for each named executive officer, expressed as a percentage of the named executive’s officer’s 2022 base salary, consistent with the policy described above, for the 2022 performance period. Mr. Congdon did not receive a PBRSU award, as he no longer receives stock based-compensation under the 2016 Plan.  

Named Executive Officer

Target 2022 PBRSU Award

As Percentage of Base Salary

Greg C. Gantt

100%

Adam N. Satterfield

100%

Kevin M. Freeman

100%

Gregory B. Plemmons

50%

The Compensation Committee believes that the grant of PBRSUs driven by prospective pre-tax income growth strikes a healthy balance with our RSA program, which is based on the Company’s current operating ratio. In conjunction with our RSA program, the Compensation Committee believes PBRSUs complement our pay-for-performance philosophy, which is designed to drive continuous improvement in our operating and financial results that should further enhance shareholder value. Our most recently completed PBRSU performance period illustrates our commitment to pay for performance. In 2021, our annual pre-tax income growth of 54% resulted in each named executive officer earning a PBRSU award at the maximum level that was equivalent to 200% of the target number of shares subject to such award. We believe that our long-term equity incentive awards will continue to motivate our executive officers to achieve strong financial success for the Company and provide long-term benefit to our shareholders.

Phantom Stock Plans

Prior to 2016, phantom stock awards were used to reward our named executive officers for creating shareholder value and to provide a long-term retirement incentive for our named executive officers. No phantom stock awards have been granted since the adoption of the 2016 Plan. In December 2019, upon the recommendation of the Compensation Committee, the Board approved the amendment and restatement of the Company’s phantom plans to permit stock settlement of outstanding phantom stock awards in shares of our common stock in lieu of cash settlement. The amended and restated Old Dominion Freight Line, Inc. Phantom Stock Plan (the “Amended 2005 Phantom Plan”) and the amended and restated Old Dominion Freight Line, Inc. 2012 Phantom Stock Plan (the “Amended 2012 Phantom Plan” and, together with the Amended 2005 Phantom Plan, the “Amended Phantom Plans”)  also provide for waivers of the age 65 or age 55 vesting terms for participants, including each of the Company’s named executive officers, who will settle their outstanding phantom stock awards in shares of our common stock. No other time-based or service-based vesting provisions were modified or accelerated for any participant as a result of the Amended Phantom Plans.

Phantom stock awards were previously granted under the Amended Phantom Plans. Each share of phantom stock awarded to participants under the Amended Phantom Plans represents a contractual right to receive an amount of common stock equal to the fair market value of a share of our common stock on the settlement date, provided that vesting provisions have been satisfied. This component of compensation generally facilitates the retention of key employees, rewards longevity and provides a retirement benefit to our named executive officers that is directly tied to shareholder value. Vesting and settlement provisions for each plan are discussed below.

Our Board approved, and we adopted, the Old Dominion Freight Line, Inc. Phantom Stock Plan (the “2005 Phantom Plan”) in May 2005. The 2005 Phantom Plan expired in May 2012; however, grants under the Amended 2005 Phantom Plan remain outstanding. Awards granted to our named executive

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officers under the Amended 2005 Phantom Plan, vest upon the earlier to occur of the following, provided the recipient is employed by us on such date: (i) the date of a change of control in our ownership; (ii) the fifth anniversary of the grant date; (iii) the date of the recipient’s death; or (iv) the date of the recipient’s total disability. Vested phantom stock awards are settled upon the earlier of the recipient’s: (i) termination of employment for any reason other than death, total disability, or for cause; (ii) death while employed by us; or (iii) termination of employment as a result of total disability. Subject to restrictions under Section 409A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), settlements are paid in 24 equal monthly installments.

Following expiration of the 2005 Phantom Plan, our Board approved, and we adopted, the Old Dominion Freight Line, Inc. 2012 Phantom Stock Plan (the “2012 Phantom Plan”) in October 2012. Although we now utilize the 2016 Plan to facilitate our long-term incentive program, grants under the Amended 2012 Phantom Plan remain outstanding. Under the Amended 2012 Phantom Plan, a maximum of 1,500,000 shares of phantom stock may be awarded to eligible employees, subject to adjustment to prevent dilution or enlargement caused by changes in our outstanding shares of common stock. Each award granted to our named executive officers vests in 20% increments on the anniversary of the grant date and is fully vested on the fifth anniversary of the grant date provided that the recipient: (i) has been continuously employed by us from the grant date until each respective vesting date; and (ii) has been continuously employed by us for at least 10 years on the respective vesting date. Vesting also occurs on the earliest of: (i) the date of a change in control of our ownership; (ii) the date of the recipient’s death; or (iii) the date of the recipient’s total disability, in each case provided that the recipient has been continuously employed by us from the grant date until the date of the respective event. Vested phantom stock awards are settled upon the earliest of the date of the recipient’s: (i) termination of employment for any reason other than death, total disability or for cause; (ii) death while employed by us; or (iii) termination of employment as a result of total disability. Settlements are generally paid in 24 equal monthly installments of shares of common stock, although recipients may, with respect to each grant, provide for payment in any other manner for up to five years following settlement subject to the limitations set forth in each individual award agreement. Each recipient also has the ability to defer the annual installments payable under an award agreement for a period of five years by filing a written election with the administrator at least one year in advance of the date on which payment of the annual installments would otherwise commence. Any payment may be delayed, if necessary, to comply with Section 409A of the Code.

In connection with the amendment and restatement of the Company’s phantom plans in December 2019, as discussed above, each of the Company’s named executive officers has entered into amended award agreements with respect to outstanding phantom stock awards, whether vested or unvested, to settle such awards in shares of our common stock, as set forth in the table below. The market value was computed by multiplying the number of phantom shares by the closing share price of $358.38 at December 31, 2021, as reported on the Nasdaq Global Select Market.

Named Executive Officer

Outstanding Vested Stock Awards under Amended Phantom Plans, as Amended for Settlement in Common Stock (#)

Market Value at

December 31, 2021 ($)

David S. Congdon

96,074

34,431,000

 

Greg C. Gantt

61,291

21,965,469

 

Adam N. Satterfield

11,024

3,950,781

 

Kevin M. Freeman

37,686

13,505,909

 

Gregory B. Plemmons

31,252

11,200,092

 

The outstanding phantom stock awards will be settled in shares of our common stock equal to the number of vested shares of phantom stock on the applicable settlement date. The shares of common stock will generally be distributed in twenty-four substantially equal monthly installments commencing on the first day of the sixth calendar month following such settlement date. All shares of common stock that may be issued to settle phantom stock awards under the Amended Phantom Plans will be issued only under, and will be subject to the terms and conditions of, the 2016 Plan.

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We do not provide a supplemental retirement plan for our named executive officers, although we do offer a voluntary, self-funded and unsecured deferred compensation program. See “Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Plan” below.

Stock Ownership Policy

The Compensation Committee and the Board strongly believe that our officers’ financial interests should be aligned with the long-term interests of our Company and its shareholders. To further this goal, the Board has adopted a stock ownership and retention policy (the “Stock Ownership Policy”) applicable to members of the Board and officers of the Company. Each officer is required to achieve and maintain a level of ownership in our common stock based on a multiple of annual base salary as described below.

Covered Individuals (1)

Base Salary Multiple Threshold

Chief Executive Officer

6.0x (600%) annual base salary

President, Chief Operating Officer and Chief Financial Officer

2.0x (200%) annual base salary

Other Executive Officers

1.5x (150%) annual base salary

All other Officers

1.0x (100%) annual base salary

 

 

(1)

If a covered individual holds multiple positions, the required stock ownership threshold applicable to such individual is the highest threshold.

 

For purposes of determining whether an officer has satisfied the Stock Ownership Policy, eligible equity may include: (i) shares owned by the officer; (ii) shares owned jointly with the officer’s spouse and/or dependent children; (iii) shares owned by the officer’s spouse or dependent children; (iv) shares held by the officer in a 401(k) plan; (v) shares held in individual brokerage accounts or other custodial accounts or in trust for the benefit of the officer or the officer’s spouse and/or dependent children; (vi) shares underlying time-based RSAs, restricted stock units, deferred stock units or similar awards (including performance- and time-based restricted stock unit awards if and to the extent earned) (in each case, whether vested or unvested); (vii) shares received upon the exercise of stock options, stock appreciation rights or similar awards; and (viii) shares received from earned performance-based awards such as performance-based restricted stock units, performance shares, performance units or similar awards. Shares of phantom stock awarded under the Amended Phantom Plans and unearned PBRSUs are not considered eligible equity for purposes of determining compliance with the Stock Ownership Policy.

Officers may utilize grants under the 2016 Plan, in the manner discussed above, to satisfy the Stock Ownership Policy. Until the applicable thresholds of ownership outlined above are met, an officer is required to retain 50% of the net shares (those shares of common stock that remain after shares are sold, delivered, or withheld in payment of withholding taxes related to equity awards) resulting from the vesting or earning of all RSAs or PBRSUs granted under the 2016 Plan, and 50% of the net shares resulting from the exercise of any stock options that may be granted under the 2016 Plan.

The Stock Ownership Policy also requires all individuals covered under this policy, including named executive officers, to retain 50% of the net shares resulting from the vesting or earning of all RSAs, restricted stock unit awards, performance awards or similar awards granted on or after June 1, 2018, and 50% of the net shares resulting from the exercise of any stock options, stock appreciation awards or similar awards granted on or after June 1, 2018, for a period of twelve months following the applicable vesting, earning or exercise date. This retention requirement applies even after the applicable thresholds of ownership described above are satisfied.

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Clawback Policy

The Compensation Committee and the Board believe it is desirable and in the best interests of the Company and its shareholders to maintain a culture of accountability and discourage conduct detrimental to the Company’s growth. To reinforce this objective, the Board has adopted a clawback policy for the recovery of cash and equity incentive compensation from the Company’s officers and other employees deemed subject to the policy. The policy provides that a covered individual may be required to forfeit or return to the Company all or a portion of any cash-based incentive compensation and/or equity-based incentive compensation received. Subject to the discretion of the Compensation Committee or the Board, reimbursement may be required (i) if such compensation was received based on quarterly or annual financial statements of the Company that are subsequently restated (other than due to changes in applicable financial reporting standards or under similar circumstances) in a manner that would decrease the amount of the compensation to which the covered individual was otherwise entitled, and (ii) such restatement is the result of, in whole or in part, the misconduct of the covered individual.

401(k) Retirement Plan

Our named executive officers may participate in our 401(k) retirement plan, which includes a matching provision that is based upon the participant’s contributions and, at our option, a discretionary contribution that is allocated to all 401(k) participants. Although we consider this match in our evaluation of overall compensation, we believe the maximum employee contribution and matching limits in our plan are, alone, insufficient to enable our named executive officers to save an amount that is adequate for their retirement or to be competitive with similarly-situated executives at other companies in our industry. As a result, we offer certain employees, including our named executive officers, the opportunity to participate in a non-qualified deferred compensation plan.

Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Plan

Because we do not provide a significant retirement plan for our named executive officers, we offer them an alternative vehicle for self-funding their retirement through our 2006 Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Plan. This plan allows eligible participants, including our named executive officers, to defer percentages of both their annual base salary and their monthly non-equity incentive compensation. The retirement benefits for our named executive officers are self-funded and unsecured, and the availability of these retirement benefits will depend on our ability to fund future payments. The plan is described in further detail under the caption “Executive Compensation - 2021 Nonqualified Deferred Compensation” in this proxy statement.

Tax Considerations

For tax years prior to January 1, 2018, Section 162(m) of the Code generally allowed us to deduct certain compensation paid to certain of our named executive officers under the Section 162(m) qualified performance-based compensation exemption. For taxable years beginning on and after January 1, 2018, the qualified performance-based compensation exemption is no longer available, except in limited situations that are eligible for transition relief, and the group of current and former named executive officers who may be covered by the deduction limit was expanded. Going forward, we will therefore not be eligible to take a full deduction under Section 162(m) for qualified performance-based compensation except in limited grandfathered situations. The Compensation Committee may modify compensation that was initially intended to be exempt from Section 162(m), to the extent permitted by applicable law and the relevant governing documents, as well as its mix of compensation elements if it determines that such modifications are consistent with our business needs. We will continue to structure our executive compensation program to place primary emphasis on performance-based incentives that are intended to align pay with performance in support of long-term shareholder value creation.

 

 

 

 

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David Congdon Employment Agreement

We currently maintain an employment agreement with Mr. Congdon, our Executive Chairman of the Board. The employment agreement is designed to:

 

establish non-competition and non-solicitation agreements, in order to limit our exposure to competition by Mr. Congdon in the event of termination of his employment;

 

provide protection to Mr. Congdon in the event we experience a change of control; and

 

limit our exposure to a sudden and significant drop in the market value of our common stock that could result from a liquidation of shares by his estate in the event of his death.

Mr. Congdon’s agreement was tailored to address the competitive and financial exposures to both us and Mr. Congdon. The terms and provisions of the agreement are described in more detail under the caption “Executive Compensation – David Congdon Employment Agreement” in this proxy statement.

Change of Control and Post-Employment Benefit Considerations

The employment agreement for Mr. Congdon provides for post-employment benefits that result from a change in control. In addition, Mr. Congdon is entitled to receive post-employment benefits upon termination by us without cause or voluntary termination for “good reason.” A “change of control” does not constitute “good reason,” but a fundamental disagreement with the Board following a change of control does constitute “good reason.” Mr. Congdon’s employment agreement, including post-employment benefits, is described in more detail under the caption “Executive Compensation – David Congdon Employment Agreement” in this proxy statement.

The Old Dominion Freight Line, Inc. Change of Control Severance Plan for Key Executives (as amended and restated effective October 31, 2018) (the “Severance Plan”) provides for post-employment benefits in the event of termination resulting from a change in control to eligible key officers, including four named executive officers: Greg C. Gantt, Adam N. Satterfield, Kevin M. Freeman and Gregory B. Plemmons. The benefits provided by this plan are described in more detail under the caption “Executive Compensation - Old Dominion Freight Line, Inc. Change of Control Severance Plan for Key Executives” in this proxy statement.

We believe that the employment agreement for Mr. Congdon and the Severance Plan provide a reasonable level of protection to our named executive officers in the event we experience a change of control. We also believe the post-employment benefits provided in Mr. Congdon’s employment agreement are an effective incentive for retaining him.

Other Benefits and Perquisites

Our named executive officers participate equitably with all employees in our employee benefits, which include medical, dental, vision, short-term disability and group life insurance. Each named executive officer receives term-life insurance benefits insuring his life for $300,000, if under the age of 70, or $150,000, if over the age of 70. In addition, the employment agreement with Mr. Congdon provides for the reimbursement of certain costs with respect to a $10,000,000 life insurance policy, subject to certain limitations. This benefit could help mitigate a sudden and significant drop in the market value of our common stock that could result from a liquidation of shares by his estate in the event of his death.

In 2021, we once again offered our officers, including our named executive officers, the opportunity to participate, on a voluntary basis, in an executive health program. For participants in this program, we paid the costs for a comprehensive health assessment to address their overall medical needs and assess their health risks. Mr. Satterfield chose to participate in this program and our cost was $2,400. This cost is included in the “All Other Compensation” column of the Summary Compensation

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Table under the caption “Executive Compensation - Summary Compensation Table” in this proxy statement. We plan to continue to offer this benefit to our officers, including our named executive officers, on an annual basis.

In 2021, Mr. Congdon, Mr. Gantt, Mr. Freeman and Mr. Plemmons elected to use a Company-provided vehicle, and Mr. Satterfield elected to receive a vehicle allowance provided by the Company. The taxable value of the personal use of these automobiles and applicable vehicle allowances is included in the “All Other Compensation” column of the Summary Compensation Table under the caption “Executive Compensation - Summary Compensation Table” in this proxy statement.

Our named executive officers may from time to time personally utilize our corporate aircraft. In 2021, personal use of our corporate aircraft by our named executive officers, their families and guests represented approximately 30.9% of the aggregate aircraft utilization hours. During the COVID-19 pandemic, flight hours for both business and personal use of corporate aircraft have declined due to related travel limitations and restrictions. The incremental cost for the personal use of our corporate aircraft by each named executive officer is included in the “All Other Compensation” column of the Summary Compensation Table under the caption “Executive Compensation - Summary Compensation Table” in this proxy statement. We do not provide any tax gross-up payments on any perquisites or benefits.

 

Advisory Vote on Executive Compensation

Since our 2011 Annual Meeting, we have conducted an advisory vote on the approval of compensation for our named executive officers each year at our annual meeting of shareholders. While this is a non-binding vote, we believe it is important for our shareholders to have an opportunity to vote on this proposal on an annual basis as a means to express their views regarding our executive compensation philosophy, our compensation policies and programs and our decisions regarding executive compensation, all of which are disclosed in our proxy statement. Our Board and Compensation Committee value the opinions of our shareholders and, to the extent there is any significant vote against the compensation of our named executive officers as disclosed in the proxy statement, we will carefully consider our shareholders’ concerns and the Compensation Committee will evaluate whether any actions are necessary to address those concerns. In addition to our annual advisory vote on executive compensation, we are committed to ongoing engagement with our shareholders on executive compensation and corporate governance issues. These engagement efforts take place throughout the year through meetings, telephone calls and correspondence involving our senior management and representatives of our shareholders.

At our 2021 Annual Meeting, approximately 94% of the votes cast on the advisory vote to approve the compensation of our named executive officers were in favor of the proposal. Our Compensation Committee and Board believe this shareholder vote reflects strong support for our executive compensation program and alignment of executive and long-term shareholder interests. In addition, the Compensation Committee believes that our executive compensation program continues to be tailored to our business strategies, is consistent with our pay-for-performance philosophy, reflects competitive pay practices, and appropriately rewards or penalizes our management team based on the level of financial success of our Company each year. Our exceptional financial performance in 2021 reinforces the view of our Compensation Committee and Board that our executive compensation program is achieving its desired objectives.

The Compensation Committee and the Board will continue to consider shareholders’ sentiments regarding our executive compensation program going forward. As part of that commitment, we have determined that our shareholders should vote on a “say-on-pay” proposal each year, consistent with the preference expressed by our shareholders most recently at our 2017 Annual Meeting. Our Board unanimously recommends that you vote “FOR” Proposal 2 at the Annual Meeting. See “Proposal 2 - Approval, on an Advisory Basis, of the Compensation of our Named Executive Officers” in this proxy statement. Our shareholders will once again have the opportunity to express a preference on the frequency of “say-on-pay” votes at our 2023 Annual Meeting.

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Conclusions

Our Compensation Committee has considered all of the elements of compensation described above and the objective of each element in determining the total amount of current compensation for our named executive officers. The Compensation Committee also considered whether our compensation policies and practices promote or encourage unnecessary and excessive risks and concluded they do not. Our compensation practices, which provide a balanced mix of short- and long-term incentives and use multiple performance metrics, together with our insider trading policy’s prohibitions on hedging and pledging of our securities, our stock ownership and retention requirements and our clawback policy, mitigate excessive risk-taking by our named executive officers. In addition, the Compensation Committee considered shareholder outreach feedback and the review and analysis of our executive compensation program conducted by Pearl Meyer, which helped the Compensation Committee make the aforementioned changes to various components of executive compensation and ultimately reaffirm the Company’s overall compensation strategy and approach. The Compensation Committee believes the amount of each element of pay and the total amount of compensation for each named executive officer are reasonable and appropriate in light of the officer’s experience and individual performance, our operational and financial performance relative to our own expectations and the industry, and the officer’s role in creating shareholder value. The Compensation Committee also believes that the program design modifications implemented beginning in 2019 will continue to appropriately incentivize our executives and further strengthen the alignment of executive compensation with our strategic goals, performance, and long-term shareholder interests.

Compensation Committee Report

The Compensation Committee of the Board of Directors has reviewed and discussed the above Compensation Discussion and Analysis required by Item 402(b) of Regulation S-K with our management. Based on such review and discussions, the Compensation Committee recommended to our Board of Directors that the Compensation Discussion and Analysis be included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2021 through incorporation by reference to this proxy statement.

Except for the Annual Report on Form 10-K described above, this Compensation Committee Report is not incorporated by reference into any of our previous or future filings with the SEC, unless such filing explicitly incorporates this report.

 

 

The Compensation Committee,

 

 

 

Leo H. Suggs (Chair)

 

Patrick D. Hanley

 

Wendy T. Stallings

 

D. Michael Wray

 

 

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Executive Compensation

Summary Compensation Table

The following table provides an overview of compensation earned by our Chief Executive Officer, our Chief Financial Officer and our three other most highly compensated executive officers serving as of December 31, 2021 (collectively, our “named executive officers”):

 

Name and 

Principal

Position

Year

Salary

($)

Stock

Awards

($)(1)

Non-Equity

Incentive Plan

Compensation

($)(2)

Change in Pension Value and Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Earnings ($)(3)

All Other

Compensation

($)(4)

Total

($)

David S. Congdon

Executive Chairman of the Board

2021

641,284

1,385,540

6,391,150

21,235

 

148,610

 

8,587,819

 

2020

765,517

1,608,515

5,526,958

31,855

 

226,322

 

8,159,167

 

2019

727,332

1,607,641

4,943,698

20,120

 

232,461

 

7,531,252

 

Greg C. Gantt

President and Chief Executive Officer

2021

774,023

1,975,247

7,744,570

46,780

 

  37,213

 

10,577,833

 

2020

765,517

1,608,515

5,526,958

52,610

 

  34,357

 

7,987,957

 

2019

727,846

1,607,641

4,943,698

24,548

 

  41,217

 

7,344,950

 

Adam N. Satterfield

Senior Vice President - Finance, Chief Financial Officer and Assistant Secretary

2021

493,042

1,257,950

3,471,056

 

  37,261

 

5,259,309

 

2020

487,624

1,024,485

2,026,551

       13

 

  36,476

 

3,575,149

 

2019

460,117

1,024,193

1,812,689

       21

 

  38,445

 

3,335,465

 

Kevin M. Freeman

Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer

2021

583,168

1,488,187

4,165,267

  4,601

 

  25,546

 

6,266,769

 

2020

576,760

1,211,840

2,763,479

  6,902

 

  25,651

 

4,584,632

 

2019

545,558

1,211,401

2,471,849

  5,844

 

  24,763

 

4,259,415

 

Gregory B. Plemmons(5)

Senior Vice   President - Sales

2021

478,432

  816,548

2,499,160

1,046

 

24,665

 

3,819,851

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(1)

The amount reflects the grant date fair value of RSAs and PBRSUs granted under the provisions of the 2016 Plan computed in accordance with Financial Accounting Standards Board Accounting Standards Codification 718, Compensation - Stock Compensation (“ASC 718”), disregarding the estimate of forfeitures related to applicable performance-based and service-based, as applicable, vesting conditions. The valuation assumptions used are summarized in Note 8 of the Notes to the Financial Statements included in Part II, Item 8 of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2021 (the “Form 10-K”). The actual amounts, if any, ultimately realized may differ from the ASC 718 grant date fair value amounts. Our Compensation Committee considers

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the grant date fair value of a restricted stock grant and the grant date fair value at target of PBRSU grants as part of compensation in the year of grant when evaluating annual compensation for our named executive officers. Assuming achievement of the PBRSUs at the maximum level, the grant date fair value of the PBRSU awards would have been as follows: Mr. Congdon, $1,101,630; Mr. Gantt, $1,570,508; Mr. Satterfield, $1,000,234; Mr. Freeman, $1,183,156; and Mr. Plemmons, $462,529.

 

(2)

Pursuant to our PIP, we pay monthly cash incentives to our named executive officers based upon our pre-tax income during the fiscal year, subject to certain restrictions. Cash incentives are generally paid in the month following the actual month in which the cash incentive is earned. The table reflects the cash incentives earned for each of the 12 months of the respective year, regardless of when the incentive payment was actually made.

 

(3)

The amounts in this column are treated as “above-market interest” (defined by current SEC rules as the portion exceeding 120% of the applicable federal long-term rate) credited to deferrals under the Company’s Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Plan.

 

(4)

See “All Other Compensation” below for the amounts and descriptions of these components of compensation in 2021.

 

(5)

Mr. Plemmons was not a named executive officer for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019.

 

All Other Compensation

 

The allocation of 2021 “All Other Compensation” from the Summary Compensation Table is presented below:

 

Named Executive Officer

Personal

Use of

Corporate

Aircraft

($)(1)

Life

Insurance

Premiums

($)(2)

Executive

Health

Program

($)(3)

Corporate

Automobile

Benefits

($)(4)

Company

Contributions

to the

401(k) Plan

($)(5)

Vested

Restricted

Stock

Accumulated

Dividends

($)(6)

Total

($)

David S. Congdon

99,229

 

18,795

 

 

 

8,291

 

 

16,040

 

 

6,255

 

 

148,610

 

Greg C. Gantt

 

3,810

 

 

 

10,993

 

 

16,353

 

 

6,057

 

 

  37,213

 

Adam N. Satterfield

 

450

 

 

2,400

 

14,820

 

 

16,029

 

 

3,562

 

 

  37,261

 

Kevin M. Freeman

 

1,980

 

 

 

4,472

 

 

15,050

 

 

4,044

 

 

  25,546

 

Gregory B. Plemmons

 

1,290

 

 

 

5,167

 

 

15,015

 

 

3,193

 

 

  24,665

 

 

(1)

For the purpose of this table, compensation for the personal use of our corporate aircraft is calculated using incremental variable cost per flight hour.

(2)

Includes the following: (i) the taxable excess group term-life insurance premiums under our group term-life insurance policy for all employees; and (ii) reimbursement of certain costs with respect to a $10,000,000 life insurance policy for Mr. Congdon as further described under the caption “Executive Compensation – David Congdon Employment Agreement” in this proxy statement.

(3)

The amount reflects our cost to provide our named executive officers with the opportunity to participate, on a voluntary basis, in an executive health program.

(4)

For Mr. Congdon, Mr. Gantt, Mr. Freeman and Mr. Plemmons, the amount reflects compensation for the personal use during 2021 of a Company-provided vehicle calculated by allocating the fixed and variable costs of the vehicle over the percentage of personal versus total mileage driven. For

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Mr. Satterfield, the amount reflects compensation for a vehicle allowance in lieu of a Company-provided vehicle for 2021.

(5)

Each of our named executive officers is eligible to participate in the Old Dominion 401(k) Employee Retirement Plan on the same basis as other employees. Employee contributions are limited to a percentage of their compensation, as defined in the plan. We guaranteed a match of 50% of the first 6% of all employee contributions in 2021. Additional employer contributions may be awarded on a non-discriminatory basis to all participants, and such discretionary employer contributions were awarded in 2021 and are included in the amounts disclosed.

(6)

Each participant in the 2016 Plan accumulates dividends for each unvested RSA, payable upon vesting. In 2021, Mr. Congdon vested in 6,131 shares and received a payment for his accumulated dividends of $6,255; Mr. Gantt vested in 5,990 shares and received a payment for his accumulated dividends of $6,057; Mr. Satterfield vested in 3,605 shares and received a payment for his accumulated dividends of $3,562; Mr. Freeman vested in 4,143 shares and received a payment for his accumulated dividends of $4,044; and Mr. Plemmons vested in 3,261 shares and received a payment for his accumulated dividends of $3,193. For more details, refer to the "2021 Stock Vested" table below.

 

2021 Grants of Plan-Based Awards

The following table provides information regarding plan-based awards under our 2016 Plan made to our named executive officers during fiscal year 2021. The actual amounts, if any, ultimately realized may differ from the amounts set forth in the “Grant Date Fair Value of Stock and Option Awards” column. Our 2016 Plan is discussed in more detail under the caption "Compensation Discussion and Analysis - Elements of Compensation - 2016 Stock Incentive Plan" in this proxy statement.      

 

 

 

Award Type (1)

Grant Date

Estimated Future Payouts

Under Non-Equity Incentive

Plan Awards

Estimated Future Payouts

Under Equity Incentive

Plan Awards

All 

Other

Stock

Awards:

Number

of

 Shares of

Stock 

or Units

(#)

Grant

Date

Fair Value of Stock

and

Option

Awards

($)(2)

Named Executive Officer

Threshold

($)

Target

($)

Maximum

($)

Threshold

(#)

Target

(#)

Maximum

(#)

David S. Congdon

RSA

2/11/2021

 

2,689

   559,420

PBRSU

2/11/2021

 

 

 

 

 

1,344

2,689

5,378

 

   826,120

Greg C. Gantt

RSA

2/11/2021

 

3,833

   797,417

PBRSU

2/11/2021

 

 

 

 

 

1,916

3,833

7,667

 

1,177,830

Adam N. Satterfield

RSA

2/11/2021

 

2,441

  507,826

PBRSU

2/11/2021

 

 

 

 

1,220

2,441

4,883

 

  750,124

Kevin M. Freeman

RSA

2/11/2021

 

2,888

  600,820

PBRSU

2/11/2021

 

 

 

 

 

1,444

2,888

5,776

 

  887,367

Gregory B.

Plemmons

RSA

2/11/2021

 

2,258

  469,754

PBRSU

2/11/2021

 

 

 

 

 

564

1,129

2,258

 

  346,794

 

 

 

 

(1)

For Mr. Congdon, the 2021 earned RSA and target PBRSU grants reflect awards equal to 85% of his base salary on the grant date divided by the average closing price of our common stock for the 50-day period beginning November 30, 2020 and ending February 10, 2021 (the “50-day moving average”). For each of Mr. Gantt, Mr. Satterfield and Mr. Freeman, the 2021 earned RSA and target PBRSU grants reflect awards equal to 100% of his base salary on the grant date divided by the average closing price of our common stock for the 50-day moving average. For Mr. Plemmons, the 2021 earned RSA and target PBRSU grants reflect awards equal to 100% and

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50%, respectively, of his base salary on the grant date divided by the average closing price of our common stock for the 50-day moving average. PBRSUs are earned, if at all, at the end of a one-year performance period based on the achievement of pre-tax income performance targets established by the Compensation Committee. One-third of any earned PBRSUs vest following conclusion of the performance period (to the extent any of the performance targets are achieved) and an additional one-third of the PBRSUs vest on each anniversary thereafter, subject to continued employment. Payouts of PBRSUs could range from 0% up to a maximum of 200% of the target award. For 2021, the Compensation Committee determined that the Company achieved a level of pre-tax income growth relative to the target that provided for the earning of the 2021 PBRSUs equaling 200% of the target award. Our Compensation Committee considers the value of the RSA grant and the target value of the PBRSU grant as part of the compensation in the year of grant when evaluating compensation to our named executive officers.

 

(2)

These amounts represent the aggregate grant date fair value computed in accordance with ASC 718. The valuation assumptions used are summarized in Note 8 of the Notes to the Financial Statements included in Part II, Item 8 of our Form 10-K. These amounts do not reflect compensation actually received by the named executive officer, and the actual amount of the stock award ultimately realized upon vesting may differ from the aggregate grant date fair value.

Outstanding Equity Awards at 2021 Fiscal Year-End

The following table reflects awards under our equity-based award incentive plans to our named executive officers that had not vested as of December 31, 2021:

 

 

 

 

Stock Awards

 

Named Executive Officer

Grant Date

Number of Shares or Units of Stock That Have Not Vested (#)

Market Value of Shares or Units of Stock That Have Not Vested ($)(3)

David S. Congdon

 

 

 

 

2/11/2021 (1)

2,689

 

   963,684

2/11/2021 (2)

5,378

 

1,927,368

2/13/2020 (1)

3,446

 

1,234,977

2/13/2020 (2)

3,829

 

1,372,237

2/14/2019 (1)

2,799

 

1,003,106

Greg C. Gantt

 

2/11/2021 (1)

3,833

 

1,373,671

2/11/2021 (2)

7,667

 

2,747,699

2/13/2020 (1)

3,446

 

1,234,977

2/13/2020 (2)

3,829

 

1,372,237

2/14/2019 (1)

2,799

 

1,003,106

Adam N. Satterfield

 

2/11/2021 (1)

2,441

 

   874,806

2/11/2021 (2)

4,883

 

1,749,970

2/13/2020 (1)

2,194